FREE EKG Certification MCQ Question and Answers

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Which perspective of the heart do leads V3–V4 provide?

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Leads V3 and V4 provide a view of the heart's anterior septal region and the left ventricle. V3 is positioned between the V2 and V4 leads, typically in the 5th intercostal space on the midclavicular line. It is adjacent to the left ventricle's anterior surface. V4 is placed on the 5th intercostal space in the midclavicular line, just to the left of the sternum. It is also in close proximity to the left ventricle's anterior surface.

When it is depressed, what section exhibits a symptom of significant pathology in the condition?

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Depression of the ST segment is a significant ECG finding that can indicate serious pathology in the cardiovascular system. When the ST segment is depressed, it typically suggests myocardial ischemia, which refers to inadequate blood supply to the heart muscle. Myocardial ischemia can occur due to narrowed or blocked coronary arteries, reducing blood flow to the heart.

Which of these conditions has a connection to the T waves in the brain?

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Cerebral T waves are specifically associated with intracranial bleeds, particularly subarachnoid hemorrhages (SAH). Therefore, among the given options, the condition related to cerebral T waves is intracranial bleed. Ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury do not typically cause cerebral T waves. Ischemic stroke refers to the blockage of blood flow to a part of the brain, while traumatic brain injury results from physical trauma to the head. These conditions may have their characteristic ECG findings or other diagnostic indicators, but they are not directly associated with cerebral T waves.

Which leads in the QRS complex would you see a Deep S wave?

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A deep S wave in the QRS complex is commonly observed in leads V1 and V2. These leads, V1 and V2, are part of the precordial leads and play a role in assessing the electrical conduction and depolarization of the anterior portion of the heart. It's important to note that the presence of a deep S wave in V1 and V2, along with other ECG findings, can provide valuable information about various cardiac conditions, such as right ventricular hypertrophy or certain conduction abnormalities.

Give the location for V4 a name.

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The correct placement for V4 in a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is the 5th intercostal space, midclavicular line. The correct placement of V4 allows for the assessment of the electrical activity of the heart's anterior wall. This lead is positioned between the V3 and V5 leads and provides valuable information about the electrical conduction in the region supplied by the left anterior descending coronary artery.

The typical QRS duration is

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The QRS duration is typically less than 0.10 seconds (10 milliseconds) in duration,A QRS duration of less than 0.10 seconds (10 milliseconds) is considered within the normal range. Prolongation of the QRS duration beyond this range can indicate abnormalities in the electrical conduction system of the heart, such as bundle branch blocks, ventricular hypertrophy, or other conduction abnormalities.

occurs when cardiac muscle is deprived of oxygen, causing the tissue to perish.

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The condition that occurs when the heart muscle cannot receive oxygen and the tissue dies is called myocardial infarction. Myocardial infarction, commonly known as a heart attack, happens when there is a prolonged or complete blockage of blood flow to a portion of the heart muscle. This blockage is usually caused by the rupture of a plaque in a coronary artery or the formation of a blood clot, which obstructs the blood supply.

Name the location of V2 that is correct:

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The correct placement of V2 in a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is the 4th intercostal space, right sternal border. Proper electrode placement is crucial for obtaining accurate and meaningful ECG readings. Placing the V2 electrode correctly allows for the assessment of the electrical activity of the heart's anterior septum and anterior wall.

What wave is ventricular repolarization represented by?

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The wave that represents ventricular repolarization in an electrocardiogram (ECG) is the T wave.The T wave in the ECG corresponds to ventricular repolarization. It is a small upward or positive deflection following the QRS complex. The shape and duration of the T wave can provide valuable information about the electrical activity of the ventricles and potential abnormalities.

On the EKG, an R-R interval is represented by .

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An R-R interval on an electrocardiogram (EKG) represents one complete cardiac cycle. The R-R interval measures the time between two consecutive R waves, which corresponds to one full cycle of ventricular depolarization and repolarization.

Which lead better exhibits the P wave?

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The P wave is best seen in lead II of a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Lead II is recorded by placing the positive electrode on the right arm (right wrist), the negative electrode on the left leg (left lower limb), and the ground electrode on the right leg (right lower limb). This lead provides a frontal view of the heart's electrical activity, with the positive electrode oriented towards the inferior part of the heart. The P wave represents atrial depolarization, which signifies the contraction of the atria. In lead II, the P wave is typically upright and precedes the QRS complex, which represents ventricular depolarization.

The V3 should be placed as follows:

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The correct placement for the V3 lead in a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) is between the V2 and V4 leads. It is typically positioned on the same horizontal level as V2 and V4, in the 5th intercostal space.

Which leads are deemed to be subpar leads?

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The inferior leads in a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are Leads II, III, and aVF. Lead II: It is placed on the right leg (right lower limb) and is referenced to the left arm (left wrist). Lead II is often considered the most important of the inferior leads and is commonly used to assess the electrical activity of the inferior wall of the left ventricle. Lead III: It is placed on the left leg (left lower limb) and is referenced to the left arm (left wrist). Lead III provides additional information about the electrical activity of the heart's inferior wall. aVF (Augmented Vector Foot): It is placed on the left leg (left lower limb) and is referenced to the right arm (right wrist). aVF provides a view of the heart's electrical activity from a different angle, specifically focusing on the inferior aspect of the heart. These leads are referred to as inferior leads because they provide information about the inferior (lower) surface of the heart. They are particularly useful for assessing conditions such as inferior myocardial infarction or abnormalities in the conduction system that involve the inferior part of the heart.

What leads fall under the category of (left) lateral leads?

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"The left lateral leads in a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) are Leads I and aVL Lead I: It is placed on the left arm (left wrist) and is referenced to the right arm (right wrist). Lead I provides a view of the heart's electrical activity along the horizontal axis. Lead aVL (Augmented Vector Left): It is placed on the left arm (left wrist) and is referenced to the right arm (right wrist). Lead aVL provides a view of the heart's electrical activity from a different angle, specifically focusing on the left side of the heart."

Where does the R wave exceed the S wave in size?

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In lead V4 of a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), the R wave is typically larger than the S wave. Lead V4 is placed in the 5th intercostal space, midclavicular line. It provides a view of the electrical activity in the anterior and septal regions of the left ventricle. In lead V4, the QRS complex often exhibits a prominent R wave with a smaller or absent S wave. This is because lead V4 is positioned to capture the electrical forces generated by the depolarization of the anterior and septal walls of the left ventricle, which contribute to the larger R wave.

Which lead do you think a BIPHASIC P wave would be in?

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A biphasic P wave, which has both a positive and negative deflection, can often be seen in Lead V1 of a standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Lead V1 is positioned in the 4th intercostal space, right sternal border. It provides a view of the electrical activity in the right atrium and can capture the P wave from a frontal perspective.

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