FREE NAVLE Feline Infectious Question and Answers

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What type of virus is FIP?

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Explanation:
A viral infection known as feline coronavirus is linked to FIP. Cat coronavirus comes in a variety of types, each with a unique propensity to sicken cats. Prior to now, there had been an attempt to categorize these strains as feline enteric coronavirus or feline infectious peritonitis virus strains, both of which can cause the FIP condition (essentially harmless strains mainly found in the intestinal tract). It is now known that feline enteric coronavirus strains have the ability to evolve (transform) into a more dangerous virus type and cause FIP.

FIP has no known treatment.

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Explanation:
Sadly, there is no treatment for FIP, and cats who exhibit the following symptoms frequently get worse over the course of days, weeks, and perhaps even months before passing away from the virus. Cats with FIP typically receive supportive treatment and are kept as comfortable as possible.

Would you ever administer antibiotics to a cat with FIP?

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Explanation:
Drain bodily cavity, parental fluids, feeding tube, blood transfusion, and Abs for 2' infection.

How would you handle FIP with ocular involvement?

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Both FIP types are fatal and progressive.

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Explanation:
FIP is a progressive, virtually always deadly condition that affects cats. Symptoms of FIP A rising and falling fever, lack of appetite, and a decline in energy are some of the early indications of FIP. Depending on the kind of FIP, infected cats may develop more FIP symptoms over time.

There is currently no viable treatment for FIP that can extend life.

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Explanation:
Cats with proven FIP are currently not eligible for any viable treatments that are currently on the market. The majority of treatment is still symptomatic until new therapies are authorized and launched.

The following types of inflammation are typically linked to FIP:

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Explanation:
Noncancerous skin growths called pyrogenic granulomas can develop as a result of hormone fluctuations or a skin injury. Larger lesions may be removed by doctors, while smaller ones may disappear on their own.

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