FREE Lean Six Sigma Yellow Belt Certification Assessment Questions and Answers

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Any activity carried out to balance off or counteract another action. This kind of action varies from solutions in that it advocates precise, tactical continuing trial and error rather than a single, long-lasting remedy. If it turns out that this is ineffectual, a different one can be created and tested. These are created following the confirmation of the root cause.

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A countermeasure is an immediate action taken to address a problem or issue that has been identified as a result of problem-solving efforts. Countermeasures are designed to mitigate or eliminate the negative impact of a problem. They are typically put into place once a root cause has been identified and verified.

The third phase in the 5S process is also referred to as "Seiso."

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"Shine," also known as "Seiso," is indeed the third step in the 5S method.
The 5S methodology is a structured approach to workplace organization and process improvement that focuses on creating a clean, organized, and efficient work environment.

The process of drastically cutting or eliminating the transition period between one unit or procedure and another.

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"Setup Reduction" refers to the practice of dramatically reducing or eliminating the time required to change from one method, process, or unit to another. It is also commonly known as "SMED," which stands for Single-Minute Exchange of Die.

Extra-Processing- Refers to the concept of adding more features or producing a product or service of higher quality than required by the customer. One of the 8 Wastes.

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"Extra-Processing" waste, also known as "Overprocessing" waste, refers to the concept of adding more features or producing a product or service of higher quality than required by the customer. It is indeed one of the 8 Wastes in Lean thinking.
"Extra-Processing" waste occurs when organizations expend resources, time, or effort on activities that do not add value from the customer's perspective. This can involve unnecessary steps, additional features, or higher levels of quality that exceed what the customer actually needs or is willing to pay for. By eliminating this waste, organizations can focus their efforts on delivering exactly what the customer values, leading to increased efficiency and reduced costs.

Employees utilize the Red Tag, a tagging tool, to identify what is necessary in a certain workspace during the Sort Phase of a 5S. They put suspect objects in a holding room and label each one with this gadget. The aim is to ascertain whether anyone believes the item is necessary and, if so, in what quantity. The information on this can vary. A less congested and better organized work place is the outcome of items being "tagged with this tool" for a limited amount of time before being thrown away, sold, or recycled.

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The "Red Tag" tool is indeed used in the Sort Phase of the 5S methodology, which is part of Lean thinking. The 5S methodology focuses on improving workplace organization and efficiency through the five steps: Sort, Set in Order, Shine, Standardize, and Sustain.

The second phase in the 5S process is Set in Order, also referred to as "Seiton."

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"Set in Order," also known as "Seiton," is the second step in the 5S method.
5S is a systematic approach for organizing and improving the workplace to enhance efficiency, safety, and overall effectiveness.

What is the BEST approach to raise an automated assembly machine's operational availability if it is currently insufficient to satisfy a rise in customer demand?

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Reducing breakdowns and delays is indeed one of the best ways to improve the operational availability of an automated assembly machine when the current availability is insufficient to meet an increase in customer demand.
Operational availability refers to the proportion of time that a machine or system is functioning and available for use when needed. To improve operational availability, the goal is to minimize downtime, breakdowns, and delays that can impact the machine's ability to operate as intended.

For the Process Owner, a Belt develops a Control Plan when she completes an LSS project. The _______________ section of the Control Plan specifies what should be done when the KPIs show signs of potentially straying outside of acceptable bounds.

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The Response Plan includes predefined steps that the organization should take to address any potential issues and prevent the process from reverting to its previous state. This proactive approach helps ensure that the improvements achieved during the Lean Six Sigma project are sustained and that any deviations from the desired performance levels are promptly addressed.

Lead Time: The amount of time a unit or service spends standing around throughout a process.

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Lead Time is a measure of the total time it takes for a unit, product, or service to move through a process from start to finish, including both the time the unit is actively being worked on and the time it is waiting or idle within the process. It encompasses all the time required for processing, waiting, transportation, and any other activities that are part of the process.

The most frequent causes of excessive cycle time in a process include Standard Work - Defects, Overproduction, Waiting, Unutilized Talent, Transportation, Inventory, Motion, and Extra-Processing.

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These eight types of waste contribute to excess cycle time in a process. The goal of Lean process improvement is to identify and eliminate or minimize these sources of waste in order to streamline processes, reduce cycle time, and enhance overall efficiency. By addressing these wastes, organizations can achieve more value-added activities, reduce costs, and improve customer satisfaction.

Which type of muda results from working longer hours than necessary, scheduling more work than is required, or spending excessive amounts of resources?

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Over-Processing, a type of waste in Lean thinking, refers to the unnecessary use of resources or effort that goes beyond what is required to produce a product or service to meet customer needs.

Fundamentals for Your Lean Journey: Kaizen Express

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"Kaizen Express: Fundamentals for Your Lean Journey" is a book written by Toshiko Narusawa and John Shook. The book focuses on the principles and practices of Lean thinking and Kaizen, which are approaches aimed at continuous improvement and waste reduction in various industries and processes.

Except for, all of the following are advantages of control programs.

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"Helps to analyze and eliminate potential X's" is not a benefit of control plans.
Control plans are a vital component of process control and quality management, particularly in the context of Lean Six Sigma methodologies. They outline the steps and measures taken to ensure that a process remains within the desired parameters and produces consistent, high-quality outputs. Control plans are designed to prevent defects, deviations, and variations from occurring in the first place.

Regular (sometimes daily) meetings with direct reports are called "Leader Huddle Meetings" and are held in front of Process Performance Boards so that participants may see organizational KPIs in a clear, easily understandable manner.

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Leader Huddle Meetings are indeed regular meetings, often held daily, where leaders gather with their direct reports in front of Process Performance Boards to discuss organizational metrics and key performance indicators (KPIs) using visual management techniques.

Defect: A straightforward but efficient approach to problem-solving that involves asking "why" five times, or as many times as necessary, to get through symptoms and find the underlying cause.

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The 5 Whys technique involves repeatedly asking "why" to the answers given, typically around five times (although it can be more or less depending on the situation), until the root cause is uncovered. By delving deeper into the causal relationships between various factors, organizations can identify and address the true sources of problems, rather than just addressing surface-level symptoms.

Involves removing variation utilizing external procedures when there are significant fluctuations in the volume of consumer demand.

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Demand Leveling, also known as Demand Smoothing or Demand Flattening, does involve using external techniques to mitigate or reduce the variation in customer demand when there are significant fluctuations in demand volume.

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