CNA Mental Health and Social Services Needs 1

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A nurse aide who is active in her church is assigned to care for a client who is not a member of any religious group. The nurse aide SHOULD

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Respecting a client's spiritual beliefs can be a challenge if they are not understood or if they are different from the nurse aide's. Compassionate care means having an open mind and not promoting any religion or spiritual practice. A client may be deeply spiritual, but not be part of a formal religion. Ask if the client has any spiritual needs, then comply with their wishes.

The nurse aide is caring for a client who is agitated. The nurse aide SHOULD

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Agitation can have several causes, including sudden changes in location or caregiver, noise, perceived fears or threats, or fatigue. Stay with the client and offer reassurances, such as, "You are safe here." or "I'll stay with you." Eliminate distractions and check for physical needs: hunger, thirst, need to use the toilet, fatigue, or pain. The client's favorite music can be soothing, as well as exercise or a new activity.

Mrs. Lee is an alert, demanding resident who uses the call signal often. If you don’t answer it immediately, she yells, “Help! Help! "When you answer the call signal, her requests are never urgent. She speaks sharply to you when you are in the room. Mrs. Lee is demonstrating

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When a client is overusing their call light, and making frequent demands, try to understand the reason behind the behavior. Anxiety is a common cause. Make frequent rounds so the client feels reassured and doesn't have to rely on the call light. It is important to note that abuse and neglect charges can be filed if a client does not receive necessary physical or mental care. This includes failure to respond to a call light.

The client looks forward to playing Bingo each morning. The best action for the nurse aide is to

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tell the client that the nurse aide may not have time to get the client ready for Bingo. encourage the client to bathe and dress self in order to be ready. tell the client the nurse aide forgot about Bingo, but they will go the next day. plan the client’s schedule so client is bathed and dressed in time for Bingo.

You can assist clients with their spiritual needs by

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Spiritual beliefs are part of the whole person and can affect how clients approach their medical care. While discussing religion is not part of most conversations, it is important to find out the client's preferences. Ask, "How do you handle stressful times?" or "Is there anything we can do to help you practice your beliefs?" Many clients are relieved to be able to discuss their needs and how their faith matters during illness and difficult times.

All behavior has meaning to the

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When a client's behavior seems puzzling or challenging, try to understand what they are trying to achieve. Are they afraid? Hungry? Cold? Ill? Clients with dementia or other brain conditions may only be aware that they are uncomfortable. Ask the family if the behavior makes sense or if there are any triggers for the behavior. As you become familiar with the client, you will learn how to interpret the behavior and assist the client.

A patient who has been depressed and complaining of feeling hopeless suddenly appears happier one morning and says that everything is okay now. What should the nurse aide do?

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One of the warning signs that someone has been planning to commit suicide is a sudden or unexpected change in mood from being sad to being happy or calm. It can indicate that the person has decided to end their life. Another similar sign is giving away favorite possessions and putting affairs in order. Never assume they have given up their suicidal thinking. Let others know, so everyone can monitor the client.

Mrs. Patton's husband died several months ago. She continues to talk about him and expects him to come visit daily. She is experiencing

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Denial is the first and natural response to loss. It serves as a temporary defense mechanism that prevents being overwhelmed by what has happened. During the denial phase, people may ignore facts because they are too painful to face. Do not confront Mrs. Patton or try to convince her that her husband has died. Ask her what he was like and what her favorite memories are. Encourage her to do her favorite activities.

Nurse aides can provide a client with a sense of security by

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An important standard of client care is to always explain what you are going to do before proceeding. Ask the client if they have any questions. Rushing a client or doing something without warning creates anxiety. If the client refuses, they may be fearful. don't argue or use force. Tell them you will return again in a few minutes.

A client with Alzheimer’s disease wanders from room to room moving the belongings of other clients to different locations. Alert and oriented clients are angry that their things have been moved. The nurse aide SHOULD

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It is not unusual for clients with Alzheimer's or dementia to take objects, and misplace or hide them. The clients are not stealing, but can be attracted by the look or feel of an object. It may also remind them of a similar object they may have owned, or they may "collect" things like pencils or coins. Do not scold or become angry. Return the items to their owners. Make a box of the client's favorite objects and talk about their meaning.

When caring for a client from another country, the nurse aide SHOULD

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Providing excellent care means treating each person as a unique individual. This includes respecting the client's beliefs, values, and religious practices. All health care professionals should learn about the ethnic groups in their service area. As a direct care provider, the CNA may be the first person that a client meets. Understanding how to communicate will increase the likelihood of successful treatment and outcomes.

A resident who is disoriented

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When a client seems disoriented, start by offering basic information. "Hello, Mr. Roberts. I'm Sally, your nurse aide. Do you remember me?" From there, offer other ways to help him regain his sense of time and place. "It's Tuesday, August 26. You had chicken for lunch and watched the movie." Returning the client to his room to look at familiar objects and photos can also be helpful. Always remain calm and friendly.

Which of the following statements might strongly support that a client is considering suicide?

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If someone is thinking about suicide, some of the warning signs are: Talking about death, losing interest in favorite things, expressing a sense of feeling hopeless or worthless, putting affairs in order, or calling others to say good-bye. Another sign is when someone has been very depressed and suddenly becomes happy and calm. if someone says, "I'd be better off dead," immediately get help for them.

A resident with dementia needs

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Daily routines can keep clients with dementia calm and focused. These clients require as much familiarity as possible in their environment. Try to include their favorite activities: Did they like to wake up early? Did they watch the evening news? Did they enjoy playing cards? Keep the daily schedule consistent: mealtimes, grooming, naps, toileting, and medications are small ways to help the clients stay anchored.

A good listening approach to use when communicating with residents is to

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For the best communication, place yourself at the resident's eye level. This helps the resident feel reassured and engaged in the interaction. Studies show that when staff sits next to clients, the clients perceive a higher quality of care. They also feel more connected to the staff.

The normal aging process is BEST defined as the time when

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The human body begins to change gradually after about 30 years. Each person ages at a different rate, depending on your medical history, lifestyle, and genetics. Over time, vision and hearing decline, and organ systems become less efficient. Muscle tissue is lost , resulting in less strength and flexibility. Remaining active, eating well, and keeping social ties can slow the aging process.

If a resident refuses to eat a certain food because of a religious preference, the CNA should

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Cultural diversity includes diets for religious reasons. There may be foods that are not allowed, strict rules for preparation, or fasting on certain days. Diets may be important in the healing process for these clients. Not getting what they need can feel like a sin or violation of their faith. Health care professionals must make sure their client's dietary needs are met and their religious beliefs are supported.

If an alert and oriented client touches a nurse aide inappropriately, the nurse aide’s BEST response is to

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Intimacy is a lifelong need for humans, and clients can be sexually active into their 80s and 90s. However, inappropriate sexual behavior is never acceptable. It can include suggestive comments, deliberate touching, or exposure of genitals. Do not ignore the behavior. The nurse aide should immediately step back and give the patient immediate and firm feedback about the inappropriate. Say, "If you do this again, I will not be able to continue to care for you."

Mrs. Melvin is a demanding patient who is difficult to please. Which of the following would be appropriate for you to do when caring for Mrs. Melvin?

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If a client is demanding, show them that you care by asking what they need or what will make them feel better. Their behavior is not directed at you, but can be a sign of anxiety, loneliness, or fear. Take time to learn more about the client; this may help you understand what is behind the behavior. Stay positive and focus on giving excellent care.

When you empathize with residents, you are

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Empathy is the ability to understand what another person is feeling or experiencing. Once you can imagine their situation, you know how to help them. Empathy also requires that we look at others without labels or bias. Active listening is an important skill for being empathetic. It helps us "hear" the emotions behind the words.

A confused and disoriented client is begging to go home. The nurse aide’s BEST response to this client is

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Clients with dementia may have times when they remember places or events. Rather than discourage or destroy their memories, validate them by asking them to tell you what they recall. Don't worry if it doesn't make sense to you. Support with comments like, "That sounds lovely." or ""I can understand why you miss your home." Often the client is not really asking to go home, but to have their memories and life recognized.

Which of following actions by the nursing assistant can help meet a resident’s social needs?

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Social rewards, such as praise and attention, are meaningful to everyone. When using praise to reinforce positive behavior and accomplishments, be specific and sincere. Tell the client what you liked. "I'm glad you went to the wood working class this morning." "Thank you for trying the zucchini at lunch today." Use praise for behaviors and skills the client is able to change.

A patient who is on suicide watch should be allowed to have

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Suicide watch is an ongoing monitoring process meant to prevent the client from hurting or killing themselves. The client is placed in a special room with nothing on the walls or ceiling. There may only be a mattress on the floor. Any object that could be used to commit suicide are removed. This includes, glass, razors, belts, shoelaces, and bed sheets. The room may have a video monitor. The client is checked at least every 15 minutes by a qualified staff member.

Which of the following stages of dying is usually the final stage?

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The five stages of grief and dying are a model that explain the emotional response to death. Both the client and the client's loved ones can experience these emotions. The stages are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. The stages are not linear; most people move back and forth. Acceptance is the final stage, when the client reflects on their life and understands that it is ending.

If a client is confused, the nurse aide should

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When a client becomes confused, try to figure out the cause. It can often be a change of routine, care giver, or a sudden memory. Start with basic reasons for the confusion. Has their schedule been changed? Is there a change in staff? Are they wearing their glasses or hearing aids? Perhaps the client saw an object or someone that reminded them of the past. A good technique is to spend time with the client reviewing familiar things and people. Look at objects and photos to reassure them and help them calm down.

Your best response to Mrs. Lee, who is showing signs of anxiety by repeatedly using the call signal, and then is sharp with you when you respond, is to

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Anxiety can cause a client to seem demanding and rude. Don't get angry or impatient, and pay attention to your body language. Do not ignore an anxious client, but work directly with them. Offering choices can help Mrs. Lee feel less dependent. Ask her opinion about her schedule. You can even address her behavior: "Mrs. Lee, you seem anxious. What can we do to make you feel better?"

The nurse aide is caring for a client whose religious beliefs do not allow the client to eat certain foods. The nurse aide should report this information to the

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Notify the nurse if you learn that a client requires a special diet. The diet should be specified on admission, but if not, the nurse can obtain an order and contact the dietician. Reasons for special diets include religion, medical conditions, and food allergies.

Mrs. Branden is a resident at your LTC facility. She is diagnosed with depression. The best way for you to help Mrs. Branden is to

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Depression is not a normal part of aging. It occurs more in females, but also in people who are single or lack a social network. Elderly people can struggle with loss, because they don't feel hopeful about the future. Medications can be useful, but support by the staff can help Mrs. Branden feel less isolated.

A resident’s daughter expresses concern because her father, who has Parkinson’s disease, appears “stuck” at times and stands still, unable to walk. The nurse aide should tell the daughter that

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When a client or family member expresses concern about the client's condition, education can be useful. Provide basic information. If you aren't certain about the client's illness, ask the nurse to speak with them. Encourage them to check resources from reliable organizations. The Parkinson's Disease Foundation website has educational materials, online seminars, and a national help line. Most diseases and chronic conditions have similar websites and resources.

If a nurse aide finds a client who is sad and crying, the nurse aide should

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No matter a client's age or mental status, sadness can occur. While crying can make some people uncomfortable, the nurse aide is in the best position to ask the client about their feelings and to offer comfort. Do not leave the client alone. Do not try to distract the client. Simply sit with the client and ask gentle questions. Listen and do not offer solutions. During sadness, people seek comfort and a kind presence. They may not be asking for a solution, but simply someone to listen. If you can help, do so.

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