Wonderlic Verbal Test

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Choose the term that best explains the meaning of the word you've been given.
Vicariously translates as

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The adverb "vicariously" is used to express how someone can perceive something through someone else's eyes. A parent, for example, might live vicariously via his child, while a friend might live vicariously through you by listening to your travel adventures.

Which word brings the statement to a close?
Our plates were cleaned away, and the waiter inquired if we were ______ with our lunch.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Happy and pleased are synonyms for satisfied. The server inquired about the clients' satisfaction with their lunch. These other options aren't idiomatically correct. The term "excited" is overused, and neither "satiated" nor "full" would be followed by "with."

Choose the right verb to finish the sentence:
When we returned home in the evening, we discovered Lanie _______ the entire day on the couch.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
In this example, hadn't moved is correct since we wish to represent the past of the past. Whoever is speaking is describing how they returned to the past. Lanie had been seated on the couch before they arrived, we know. We employ the pluperfect in this series of events to represent Lanie's activities.

Choose the most grammatically correct sentence.

Correct! Wrong!

The correct answer:
When taking the bus, make sure to always keep your belongings in sight.

Are You SAD?
A
(1) If you are like many people, the coming of winter gets you down. (2)Some hibernation tendencies are normal. (3) If you notice true depression a sense of hopelessness less energy, or anxiety you may be suffering from seasonal affective disorder, also known as SAD. (4) Some people experience SAD during spring and summer for most people, however, winter is the season to be SAD.
B
(5) Researchers are not certainly what causes SAD. (6) One suggestion is that having our regular body rhythms disrupted when less sunlight is available is the culprit. (7) Another study blames increased production of melatonin, a hormone related to sleep. (8) During the dark winter months, the body makes more melatonin. (9) At the same time, it makes less serotonin, the brain chemical that effects our moods. (10) Fewer sunlight means less serotonin. (11) Risk factors has not been identified.
C
(12) Most people with SAD just tough it out and waiting for spring. (14) If you have symptoms that last more than two weeks, it is time to see a doctor. (15) People with mild cases of SAD need to spend time outside, exercise regularly, and go to social events or travel. (16) The good news is that spring always comes?
Sentence (1): "If you're like a lot of people, the arrival of winter brings you down."
If you rewrote sentence 1 starting with the words the arrival of winter depresses you, the following words would be

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
This is a sentence reconstruction exercise in which the independent clause is moved to its typical position at the start of the sentence. As a result, if you become the dependent clause's start. "Like many" is erroneous since these phrases create an impossible clause to begin with. "You are" is likewise incorrect; it is unnecessary to remove it from the clause. "Are like" is incorrect; it is not a good idea to start with a verb. "Many people" would necessitate a complete rewrite of the sentence, thus it is inaccurate.

Which set of words completes a sentence?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
It is a complete sentence because it contains both a noun and a verb.

Are You SAD?
A
(1) If you are like many people, the coming of winter gets you down. (2)Some hibernation tendencies are normal. (3) If you notice true depression a sense of hopelessness less energy, or anxiety you may be suffering from seasonal affective disorder, also known as SAD. (4) Some people experience SAD during spring and summer for most people, however, winter is the season to be SAD.
B
(5) Researchers are not certainly what causes SAD. (6) One suggestion is that having our regular body rhythms disrupted when less sunlight is available is the culprit. (7) Another study blames increased production of melatonin, a hormone related to sleep. (8) During the dark winter months, the body makes more melatonin. (9) At the same time, it makes less serotonin, the brain chemical that effects our moods. (10) Fewer sunlight means less serotonin. (11) Risk factors has not been identified.
C
(12) Most people with SAD just tough it out and waiting for spring. (14) If you have symptoms that last more than two weeks, it is time to see a doctor. (15) People with mild cases of SAD need to spend time outside, exercise regularly, and go to social events or travel. (16) The good news is that spring always comes?
"The body produces more melatonin during the dark winter months," says sentence (8).
The following words would appear if you rewrote sentence (8) starting with the phrase The body produces more melatonin.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The question is meant to assess students' ability to reorganize a sentence, in this example, by putting the independent clause first, which is the most common position in a sentence. Beginning with during the prepositional phrase must follow. It is incorrect: "winter months." The prepositional phrase ends with these two words, not the first two. Similarly, "black winter" is erroneous. These two words modify the prepositional phrase's object; starting with them is not possible grammatically. "The dark" is improper since it adds two more modifiers to the prepositional phrase's object. "Months the" pulls a word from both the prepositional phrase and the independent clause, which is incorrect.

Are You SAD?
A
(1) If you are like many people, the coming of winter gets you down. (2)Some hibernation tendencies are normal. (3) If you notice true depression a sense of hopelessness less energy, or anxiety you may be suffering from seasonal affective disorder, also known as SAD. (4) Some people experience SAD during spring and summer for most people, however, winter is the season to be SAD.
B
(5) Researchers are not certainly what causes SAD. (6) One suggestion is that having our regular body rhythms disrupted when less sunlight is available is the culprit. (7) Another study blames increased production of melatonin, a hormone related to sleep. (8) During the dark winter months, the body makes more melatonin. (9) At the same time, it makes less serotonin, the brain chemical that effects our moods. (10) Fewer sunlight means less serotonin. (11) Risk factors has not been identified.
C
(12) Most people with SAD just tough it out and waiting for spring. (14) If you have symptoms that last more than two weeks, it is time to see a doctor. (15) People with mild cases of SAD need to spend time outside, exercise regularly, and go to social events or travel. (16) The good news is that spring always comes?
Sentence (11): “Risk factors has not been identified.” "Risk factors have not been identified," says sentence 11.
What is the best way to write the sentence's underlined portion? Option 1 is the best method to phrase the sentence if you believe the original is the best way to write it.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Factors are numerous. Thus, it necessitates a plural verb but is singular, resulting in a conflict between subject and verb. Have is the plural version of the word has and must be used here. "Risk factors have not" is inaccurate; there is a subject-verb agreement mistake in the statement. "Risk factors have not" is also incorrect. The capital letter is removed, which results in an additional mistake. "Risk factor have not" is inaccurate since the adjustment merely agrees with the problem rather than solving it. "Risk factors have never" adds a double negative to the problem while doing nothing to solve it.

Are You SAD?
A
(1) If you are like many people, the coming of winter gets you down. (2)Some hibernation tendencies are normal. (3) If you notice true depression a sense of hopelessness less energy, or anxiety you may be suffering from seasonal affective disorder, also known as SAD. (4) Some people experience SAD during spring and summer for most people, however, winter is the season to be SAD.
B
(5) Researchers are not certainly what causes SAD. (6) One suggestion is that having our regular body rhythms disrupted when less sunlight is available is the culprit. (7) Another study blames increased production of melatonin, a hormone related to sleep. (8) During the dark winter months, the body makes more melatonin. (9) At the same time, it makes less serotonin, the brain chemical that effects our moods. (10) Fewer sunlight means less serotonin. (11) Risk factors has not been identified.
C
(12) Most people with SAD just tough it out and waiting for spring. (14) If you have symptoms that last more than two weeks, it is time to see a doctor. (15) People with mild cases of SAD need to spend time outside, exercise regularly, and go to social events or travel. (16) The good news is that spring always comes?
"At the same time, it produces less serotonin, the brain chemical that affects our moods," says sentence 9.
What is the best way to improve this sentence?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The quiz assesses students' understanding of two commonly misunderstood terms: effect and affect. The words "effect" and "impact" both imply "to bring about." In this sentence, the term affect is proper. "Move the first phrase after serotonin" is incorrect; it is not permissible to put a phrase between a noun and the words in front of it. It is wrong to say "change less to fewer." Less refers to a numerical value, like in this sentence. Fewer is a word that refers to numbers and can be used to describe items that can be tallied. The proper adverb is being employed. The phrase "capitalize serotonin" is erroneous; the word is not a proper noun and does not need to be capitalized. "There is no need for rectification" is incorrect; the statement has an obvious error.

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