UCAT Verbal Reasoning Test #5

0%

Golf's goal is to use the fewest strokes possible to get a ball from a starting position (the tee) into a hole on the green. 18-hole courses offer a normal par score for each hole, which is often three, four, or five shots, putting the course's standard par between 60 and 72. This could change depending on how far a course is and how many holes there are. Such a score is extremely tough to achieve, and often only experts are capable of doing so.

Golf uses a special scoring system that was created to allow amateur players to compete equally with professionals. It is founded on "handicap."

If there were no way to level things up, the better player would win every time with ease. Each player is given a handicap, or the number of strokes that can be subtracted from their round score, in order to give them a reasonable chance of victory. Therefore, a golfer with a handicap of 15 would be expected to complete a 70-par course in 85 strokes. The match would be decided by deducting the respective handicaps from the actual scores made, with the player with the lowest score winning, if he or she was playing against a player with a handicap of 20.

Participating in a "qualifying" event can alter a golfer's handicap. Let's say a golfer with a 20-stroke handicap completes the 70-par course in 85 strokes, which is five strokes less than predicted. The following time they play in a competitive setting, their handicap will be lowered.

The pars on various golf courses vary because

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The opening sentence reads: "18-hole courses have a standard par score for each hole, which is typically three, four, or five shots, putting the course's standard par between 60 and 72. This could change depending on how far a course is and how many holes there are."

Golf's goal is to use the fewest strokes possible to get a ball from a starting position (the tee) into a hole on the green. 18-hole courses offer a normal par score for each hole, which is often three, four, or five shots, putting the course's standard par between 60 and 72. This could change depending on how far a course is and how many holes there are. Such a score is extremely tough to achieve, and often only experts are capable of doing so.

Golf uses a special scoring system that was created to allow amateur players to compete equally with professionals. It is founded on "handicap."

If there were no way to level things up, the better player would win every time with ease. Each player is given a handicap, or the number of strokes that can be subtracted from their round score, in order to give them a reasonable chance of victory. Therefore, a golfer with a handicap of 15 would be expected to complete a 70-par course in 85 strokes. The match would be decided by deducting the respective handicaps from the actual scores made, with the player with the lowest score winning, if he or she was playing against a player with a handicap of 20.

Participating in a "qualifying" event can alter a golfer's handicap. Let's say a golfer with a 20-stroke handicap completes the 70-par course in 85 strokes, which is five strokes less than predicted. The following time they play in a competitive setting, their handicap will be lowered.

Qualification contests are held in order that:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The final sentence explains the significance of the fact that a golfer's handicap can be altered by participating in a "qualifying" event.

Golf's goal is to use the fewest strokes possible to get a ball from a starting position (the tee) into a hole on the green. 18-hole courses offer a normal par score for each hole, which is often three, four, or five shots, putting the course's standard par between 60 and 72. This could change depending on how far a course is and how many holes there are. Such a score is extremely tough to achieve, and often only experts are capable of doing so.

Golf uses a special scoring system that was created to allow amateur players to compete equally with professionals. It is founded on "handicap."

If there were no way to level things up, the better player would win every time with ease. Each player is given a handicap, or the number of strokes that can be subtracted from their round score, in order to give them a reasonable chance of victory. Therefore, a golfer with a handicap of 15 would be expected to complete a 70-par course in 85 strokes. The match would be decided by deducting the respective handicaps from the actual scores made, with the player with the lowest score winning, if he or she was playing against a player with a handicap of 20.

Participating in a "qualifying" event can alter a golfer's handicap. Let's say a golfer with a 20-stroke handicap completes the 70-par course in 85 strokes, which is five strokes less than predicted. The following time they play in a competitive setting, their handicap will be lowered.

In horse racing, there is even another type of handicap. The jockey and more weight are placed on the better horses. Golf handicapping and this are comparable because

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
In order to give everyone a chance to win, the third paragraph states that a handicap's objective is to make it harder for skilled players to triumph. All horses would finish at nearly the same time if a better horse was carrying more weight.

The teleological defense of the presence of a Creator or Supreme Being has been utilized frequently since the Greeks. William Paley memorably described it in 1802, imagining discovering a pocket watch on a heath. If you had never seen a watch before, you might be in awe of its workings and believe, correctly, that it was crafted by a skilled individual. He cited the complex structure of living things and claimed that because of how skillfully they were put together, they must have been created by an unidentified designer. He continued by asserting that a hidden designer is at work because natural organs and organisms appear to have a function (bees pollinate flowers, the eye's complex anatomy allows us to see, etc.). Another argument in favor of a designed and intentional universe is the fact that the universe follows well-known laws, such as Newton's Laws of Motion.

When Charles Darwin published his theory of natural selection as an explanation for the variety and complexity of living beings fifty years later, this contention was significantly refuted. This was not implied to have a secret designer. The evolutionist Richard Dawkins published a book named "The Blind Watchmaker" that explains evolution by natural selection more than 150 years after Darwin.

The Blind Watchmaker, the title of Dawkins' book, is fitting because:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Using Paley's analogy, Dawkins claims that natural selection is blind in the sense that it doesn't work towards a specific end goal and that the creator of Paley's watch couldn't be blind since doing so would make constructing the watch too difficult or impossible.

Golf's goal is to use the fewest strokes possible to get a ball from a starting position (the tee) into a hole on the green. 18-hole courses offer a normal par score for each hole, which is often three, four, or five shots, putting the course's standard par between 60 and 72. This could change depending on how far a course is and how many holes there are. Such a score is extremely tough to achieve, and often only experts are capable of doing so.

Golf uses a special scoring system that was created to allow amateur players to compete equally with professionals. It is founded on "handicap."

If there were no way to level things up, the better player would win every time with ease. Each player is given a handicap, or the number of strokes that can be subtracted from their round score, in order to give them a reasonable chance of victory. Therefore, a golfer with a handicap of 15 would be expected to complete a 70-par course in 85 strokes. The match would be decided by deducting the respective handicaps from the actual scores made, with the player with the lowest score winning, if he or she was playing against a player with a handicap of 20.

Participating in a "qualifying" event can alter a golfer's handicap. Let's say a golfer with a 20-stroke handicap completes the 70-par course in 85 strokes, which is five strokes less than predicted. The following time they play in a competitive setting, their handicap will be lowered.

Competing against each other are two golfers. It will be decided who wins by:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The match would be decided by deducting the respective handicaps from the actual scores made, with the lowest score winning, according to the third paragraph's final sentence.

The teleological defense of the presence of a Creator or Supreme Being has been utilized frequently since the Greeks. William Paley memorably described it in 1802, imagining discovering a pocket watch on a heath. If you had never seen a watch before, you might be in awe of its workings and believe, correctly, that it was crafted by a skilled individual. He cited the complex structure of living things and claimed that because of how skillfully they were put together, they must have been created by an unidentified designer. He continued by asserting that a hidden designer is at work because natural organs and organisms appear to have a function (bees pollinate flowers, the eye's complex anatomy allows us to see, etc.). Another argument in favor of a designed and intentional universe is the fact that the universe follows well-known laws, such as Newton's Laws of Motion.

When Charles Darwin published his theory of natural selection as an explanation for the variety and complexity of living beings fifty years later, this contention was significantly refuted. This was not implied to have a secret designer. The evolutionist Richard Dawkins published a book named "The Blind Watchmaker" that explains evolution by natural selection more than 150 years after Darwin.

Which of these claims is best supported by the passage's information?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The section from Charles Darwin's theory that reads, "Theory of natural selection as an explanation for the variety and complexity of living beings," supports it. This was not implied to have a secret designer. Events therefore are not planned; they happen by accident.

The teleological defense of the presence of a Creator or Supreme Being has been utilized frequently since the Greeks. William Paley memorably described it in 1802, imagining discovering a pocket watch on a heath. If you had never seen a watch before, you might be in awe of its workings and believe, correctly, that it was crafted by a skilled individual. He cited the complex structure of living things and claimed that because of how skillfully they were put together, they must have been created by an unidentified designer. He continued by asserting that a hidden designer is at work because natural organs and organisms appear to have a function (bees pollinate flowers, the eye's complex anatomy allows us to see, etc.). Another argument in favor of a designed and intentional universe is the fact that the universe follows well-known laws, such as Newton's Laws of Motion.

When Charles Darwin published his theory of natural selection as an explanation for the variety and complexity of living beings fifty years later, this contention was significantly refuted. This was not implied to have a secret designer. The evolutionist Richard Dawkins published a book named "The Blind Watchmaker" that explains evolution by natural selection more than 150 years after Darwin.

Teleology can be outlined as follows from the passage:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The first paragraph's statement that "the teleological argument has been often utilized to argue the existence of a Creator or Supreme Being" corroborates this claim.

The teleological defense of the presence of a Creator or Supreme Being has been utilized frequently since the Greeks. William Paley memorably described it in 1802, imagining discovering a pocket watch on a heath. If you had never seen a watch before, you might be in awe of its workings and believe, correctly, that it was crafted by a skilled individual. He cited the complex structure of living things and claimed that because of how skillfully they were put together, they must have been created by an unidentified designer. He continued by asserting that a hidden designer is at work because natural organs and organisms appear to have a function (bees pollinate flowers, the eye's complex anatomy allows us to see, etc.). Another argument in favor of a designed and intentional universe is the fact that the universe follows well-known laws, such as Newton's Laws of Motion.

When Charles Darwin published his theory of natural selection as an explanation for the variety and complexity of living beings fifty years later, this contention was significantly refuted. This was not implied to have a secret designer. The evolutionist Richard Dawkins published a book named "The Blind Watchmaker" that explains evolution by natural selection more than 150 years after Darwin.

Using the details from the passage, the following is what it means to believe in a Supreme Being:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The teleological argument in the first paragraph suggests the existence of a Supreme Being, which Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection in the second paragraph can be used to refute.

Epistolary novels rose to fame in England in the eighteenth century, but the genre was outmoded by the year 1800. In response to social change, their popularity increased. After around 1700, a large number of upper class women attained a high degree of reading and had more free time than their foremothers. Visits, letters filled with news from friends and family, reading, and stitching kept the time occupied. Naturally, two of these passions fueled the development of this literary subgenre.

Epistolary novels, which are typically written in the form of letters, may also contain diary entries. By mimicking actual events, authors can convey a sense of reality. Without relying on all-knowing, constantly present narrators, letters helped create story, shift viewpoints, and highlight characteristics of character. The most common sort of polylogic books had simultaneous contributions from three or more "writers." This made it possible to apply the technique of "discrepant awareness," in which the reader and some characters are aware of facts that have not yet been revealed to others.

The typical subject matter of epistolary books in the eighteenth century was romance, which exposed the genre to severe mockery. Loss of popularity was consequently caused by altered leisure habits, derision, a more pragmatic outlook, and a desire for a more narrative approach. Despite this, the epistolary book was nonetheless popular in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and it seems to be making a comeback again.

Which of these statements regarding epistolary books is most supported by the passage's examples?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
According to paragraph two, authors evoked realism by mimicking real life.

Epistolary novels rose to fame in England in the eighteenth century, but the genre was outmoded by the year 1800. In response to social change, their popularity increased. After around 1700, a large number of upper class women attained a high degree of reading and had more free time than their foremothers. Visits, letters filled with news from friends and family, reading, and stitching kept the time occupied. Naturally, two of these passions fueled the development of this literary subgenre.

Epistolary novels, which are typically written in the form of letters, may also contain diary entries. By mimicking actual events, authors can convey a sense of reality. Without relying on all-knowing, constantly present narrators, letters helped create story, shift viewpoints, and highlight characteristics of character. The most common sort of polylogic books had simultaneous contributions from three or more "writers." This made it possible to apply the technique of "discrepant awareness," in which the reader and some characters are aware of facts that have not yet been revealed to others.

The typical subject matter of epistolary books in the eighteenth century was romance, which exposed the genre to severe mockery. Loss of popularity was consequently caused by altered leisure habits, derision, a more pragmatic outlook, and a desire for a more narrative approach. Despite this, the epistolary book was nonetheless popular in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and it seems to be making a comeback again.

The paragraph claims that all of the following—with the exception of one—were reasons in the drop in popularity of epistolary books.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
It seems unlikely that readers want a more moral approach because, as stated in paragraph three, epistolary novels were quite moralistic, and the passage provides no further support for this claim. The style was mocked, desires for more narrative forms grew, and leisure behavior (i.e., relaxation) changed, according to what is said.

Epistolary novels rose to fame in England in the eighteenth century, but the genre was outmoded by the year 1800. In response to social change, their popularity increased. After around 1700, a large number of upper class women attained a high degree of reading and had more free time than their foremothers. Visits, letters filled with news from friends and family, reading, and stitching kept the time occupied. Naturally, two of these passions fueled the development of this literary subgenre.

Epistolary novels, which are typically written in the form of letters, may also contain diary entries. By mimicking actual events, authors can convey a sense of reality. Without relying on all-knowing, constantly present narrators, letters helped create story, shift viewpoints, and highlight characteristics of character. The most common sort of polylogic books had simultaneous contributions from three or more "writers." This made it possible to apply the technique of "discrepant awareness," in which the reader and some characters are aware of facts that have not yet been revealed to others.

The typical subject matter of epistolary books in the eighteenth century was romance, which exposed the genre to severe mockery. Loss of popularity was consequently caused by altered leisure habits, derision, a more pragmatic outlook, and a desire for a more narrative approach. Despite this, the epistolary book was nonetheless popular in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and it seems to be making a comeback again.

Which of these claims is not supported by the passage's information?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The genre only receives criticism for its "very moralistic" portrayal of romance.

Comments are closed.

Related Content
Open