UCAT Verbal Reasoning Test #4

0%

The goal of the practical exams is to guarantee practitioners' competency and the public's continuous trust in their profession by determining if they have acquired a sufficient level of knowledge and ability. Before receiving a license and becoming eligible to practice, all candidates must pass Parts 1 and 2 of the Practical Examinations (PE-1 and PE-2), administered by the Qualifications Board.

Candidates must have finished the final Diploma and possess a recognized certificate proving they have been evaluated to diploma level in order to be eligible to sit for PE-1 and PE-2. The International Training Directory for the profession includes a list of organizations that offer recognized diploma courses and certificates. The only applicants who can take PE-1 and PE-2 without waiting are those who have an Advanced Theory Certificate, which is the only exemption to the Diploma route.

When determining eligibility to sit the Practical Exams, Advanced Theory Certificates are treated similarly to Diplomas.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
According to the second paragraph, students must have successfully completed the final Diploma in order to be eligible to sit for [Practical Exams 1] and [Practical Exams 2]. The only applicants who can take PE-1 and PE-2 without waiting are those who have an Advanced Theory Certificate, which is the only exemption to the Diploma route. They are comparable, as evidenced by this.

The goal of the practical exams is to guarantee practitioners' competency and the public's continuous trust in their profession by determining if they have acquired a sufficient level of knowledge and ability. Before receiving a license and becoming eligible to practice, all candidates must pass Parts 1 and 2 of the Practical Examinations (PE-1 and PE-2), administered by the Qualifications Board.

Candidates must have finished the final Diploma and possess a recognized certificate proving they have been evaluated to diploma level in order to be eligible to sit for PE-1 and PE-2. The International Training Directory for the profession includes a list of organizations that offer recognized diploma courses and certificates. The only applicants who can take PE-1 and PE-2 without waiting are those who have an Advanced Theory Certificate, which is the only exemption to the Diploma route.

After successfully completing the Diploma, Advanced Theory, PE-1, and PE-2, licenses are granted.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
After successfully completing the Advanced Theory, the PE-1, and the PE-2 exams as well as the Diploma, licenses are granted. Not after successfully completing the Advanced Theory Certificate and Diploma.

The goal of the practical exams is to guarantee practitioners' competency and the public's continuous trust in their profession by determining if they have acquired a sufficient level of knowledge and ability. Before receiving a license and becoming eligible to practice, all candidates must pass Parts 1 and 2 of the Practical Examinations (PE-1 and PE-2), administered by the Qualifications Board.

Candidates must have finished the final Diploma and possess a recognized certificate proving they have been evaluated to diploma level in order to be eligible to sit for PE-1 and PE-2. The International Training Directory for the profession includes a list of organizations that offer recognized diploma courses and certificates. The only applicants who can take PE-1 and PE-2 without waiting are those who have an Advanced Theory Certificate, which is the only exemption to the Diploma route.

Before moving on to the Practical Examinations, the Diploma is the highest level qualification that can be earned.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
According to the passage, a Diploma level is required in order to be eligible to take the Practical Examinations. The paragraph does not, however, address whether the Diploma is the highest level credential that can be obtained prior to taking the practical exams.

The goal of the practical exams is to guarantee practitioners' competency and the public's continuous trust in their profession by determining if they have acquired a sufficient level of knowledge and ability. Before receiving a license and becoming eligible to practice, all candidates must pass Parts 1 and 2 of the Practical Examinations (PE-1 and PE-2), administered by the Qualifications Board.

Candidates must have finished the final Diploma and possess a recognized certificate proving they have been evaluated to diploma level in order to be eligible to sit for PE-1 and PE-2. The International Training Directory for the profession includes a list of organizations that offer recognized diploma courses and certificates. The only applicants who can take PE-1 and PE-2 without waiting are those who have an Advanced Theory Certificate, which is the only exemption to the Diploma route.

People who received their first qualifications outside of the nation are eligible to complete PE-1 and PE-2 and receive a license to practice.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
According to the passage, anyone who has a diploma from a reputable institution that is recognized in the international training directory for their field is eligible to sit for the practical exams and receive a license to practice.

Wealthy landowners have desired to leave their holdings to their heirs throughout history. Up to the English Civil War, the Court of Chancery forbade any attempt to accomplish this. Orlando Bridgeman then devised a plan to safeguard Royalist lands in the 1650s. Royalists who were defeated did not want to be compelled to sell their possessions in order to pay fines levied by Parliament.

The rigorous (or restricted) settlement plan was successful. Landowners and attorneys soon accepted it as the standard practice for passing down land between generations. It was in use for about three centuries without change, and only a Parliamentary Act could reverse it.

It functioned by giving trustees ownership for centuries. An unknown and unborn male heir received the land as its inheritance. The landowner changed his status to life tenant, unable to sell or mortgage the'settled' land but able to utilise the estate's income. Every new generation had to renew settlements that lasted just one lifetime. When the oldest son turned 21 or got married, this was typically done.

With the promise of a significant increase in their allowance—often their only source of income—the heir could be persuaded to renew the settlement. Loss of any funds received from the father could result from a refusal to renew. When the heir eventually inherited the estate, this unsettled land would be legally up for sale if the settlement wasn't renewed.

It can be concluded from the passage that the strict settlement was:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The settlement served to safeguard landowners because for "three centuries, affluent landowners have exploited the method to bequeath their lands to their heirs." The sentence directly contradicts the alternative theories: Bridgeman created the system, which was a means of avoiding fines that was quickly embraced by the legal community.

Wealthy landowners have desired to leave their holdings to their heirs throughout history. Up to the English Civil War, the Court of Chancery forbade any attempt to accomplish this. Orlando Bridgeman then devised a plan to safeguard Royalist lands in the 1650s. Royalists who were defeated did not want to be compelled to sell their possessions in order to pay fines levied by Parliament.

The rigorous (or restricted) settlement plan was successful. Landowners and attorneys soon accepted it as the standard practice for passing down land between generations. It was in use for about three centuries without change, and only a Parliamentary Act could reverse it.

It functioned by giving trustees ownership for centuries. An unknown and unborn male heir received the land as its inheritance. The landowner changed his status to life tenant, unable to sell or mortgage the'settled' land but able to utilise the estate's income. Every new generation had to renew settlements that lasted just one lifetime. When the oldest son turned 21 or got married, this was typically done.

With the promise of a significant increase in their allowance—often their only source of income—the heir could be persuaded to renew the settlement. Loss of any funds received from the father could result from a refusal to renew. When the heir eventually inherited the estate, this unsettled land would be legally up for sale if the settlement wasn't renewed.

The passage leads one to the conclusion that the strict settlement:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The land "devolved on an unnamed and as of yet unborn male successor," according to paragraph three.

Wealthy landowners have desired to leave their holdings to their heirs throughout history. Up to the English Civil War, the Court of Chancery forbade any attempt to accomplish this. Orlando Bridgeman then devised a plan to safeguard Royalist lands in the 1650s. Royalists who were defeated did not want to be compelled to sell their possessions in order to pay fines levied by Parliament.

The rigorous (or restricted) settlement plan was successful. Landowners and attorneys soon accepted it as the standard practice for passing down land between generations. It was in use for about three centuries without change, and only a Parliamentary Act could reverse it.

It functioned by giving trustees ownership for centuries. An unknown and unborn male heir received the land as its inheritance. The landowner changed his status to life tenant, unable to sell or mortgage the'settled' land but able to utilise the estate's income. Every new generation had to renew settlements that lasted just one lifetime. When the oldest son turned 21 or got married, this was typically done.

With the promise of a significant increase in their allowance—often their only source of income—the heir could be persuaded to renew the settlement. Loss of any funds received from the father could result from a refusal to renew. When the heir eventually inherited the estate, this unsettled land would be legally up for sale if the settlement wasn't renewed.

Which of the following claims is not supported by the material in the passage?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The plan was created by Orlando Bridgeman to save Royalist holdings, but there is no proof that he was the first landowner to employ it. The other options are backed by the discussion of the consequences of not renewing in paragraph 4, the possibility that the last heir has not yet been born, and the explanation in paragraph 3 of how the program operated by "vesting ownership in trustees for hundreds of years."

Wealthy landowners have desired to leave their holdings to their heirs throughout history. Up to the English Civil War, the Court of Chancery forbade any attempt to accomplish this. Orlando Bridgeman then devised a plan to safeguard Royalist lands in the 1650s. Royalists who were defeated did not want to be compelled to sell their possessions in order to pay fines levied by Parliament.

The rigorous (or restricted) settlement plan was successful. Landowners and attorneys soon accepted it as the standard practice for passing down land between generations. It was in use for about three centuries without change, and only a Parliamentary Act could reverse it.

It functioned by giving trustees ownership for centuries. An unknown and unborn male heir received the land as its inheritance. The landowner changed his status to life tenant, unable to sell or mortgage the'settled' land but able to utilise the estate's income. Every new generation had to renew settlements that lasted just one lifetime. When the oldest son turned 21 or got married, this was typically done.

With the promise of a significant increase in their allowance—often their only source of income—the heir could be persuaded to renew the settlement. Loss of any funds received from the father could result from a refusal to renew. When the heir eventually inherited the estate, this unsettled land would be legally up for sale if the settlement wasn't renewed.

Which of these claims is supported by the passage's information?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Their grant was frequently their "sole source of money," according to paragraph four.

Edenshire is a county that spans roughly 20 miles from north to south and twice that distance from east to west. The single town in the county, Merryburgh, governs the only crossing point over the east-flowing Eagle River. Merryburgh is located in the county's center. Before reaching the sea, it flows for 50 kilometers outside the county line. Merryburgh is home to almost a third of the population, but the bulk lives in unincorporated communities and rural farms.

The county's manufacturing sector is somewhat small. In Edenshire, two-fifths of the adult population work on farms or in forests, but around one-quarter of all Edenshire individuals must find employment in Northgateshire, a neighboring county. The majority of these people work in retail sales or as factory workers. Despite widespread objections to the loss of this valuable asset, Merryburgh's unprofitable medieval market will soon be shut down.

Three-quarters of the county are owned by Lord Edendale, the main employer. Like his forebears, he has never agreed to sell any properties. He feels it is his obligation to protect the history of his family for future generations. Lord Edendale's father passed away two years ago, leaving behind his fortune as well as a sizable inheritance tax obligation. Lord Edendale has to raise money by selling off property. He recently turned down a substantial offer to sell prime agricultural property so that an industrial complex could be built on it. Although he feared it would impair the modest but burgeoning tourist economy and harm the fishing industry by contaminating the river, doing this would have allowed him to pay off his debts. He has no choice but to sell a priceless Gainsborough picture that has been in his family since 1750. How can he pay his bills, protect the birthright of his heirs, and watch out for the welfare of his tenants?

Lord Edendale primarily declined to sell property for industrial development because:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The family custom of maintaining the estate is mentioned in paragraph three, and this could not happen if he sold land.

Edenshire is a county that spans roughly 20 miles from north to south and twice that distance from east to west. The single town in the county, Merryburgh, governs the only crossing point over the east-flowing Eagle River. Merryburgh is located in the county's center. Before reaching the sea, it flows for 50 kilometers outside the county line. Merryburgh is home to almost a third of the population, but the bulk lives in unincorporated communities and rural farms.

The county's manufacturing sector is somewhat small. In Edenshire, two-fifths of the adult population work on farms or in forests, but around one-quarter of all Edenshire individuals must find employment in Northgateshire, a neighboring county. The majority of these people work in retail sales or as factory workers. Despite widespread objections to the loss of this valuable asset, Merryburgh's unprofitable medieval market will soon be shut down.

Three-quarters of the county are owned by Lord Edendale, the main employer. Like his forebears, he has never agreed to sell any properties. He feels it is his obligation to protect the history of his family for future generations. Lord Edendale's father passed away two years ago, leaving behind his fortune as well as a sizable inheritance tax obligation. Lord Edendale has to raise money by selling off property. He recently turned down a substantial offer to sell prime agricultural property so that an industrial complex could be built on it. Although he feared it would impair the modest but burgeoning tourist economy and harm the fishing industry by contaminating the river, doing this would have allowed him to pay off his debts. He has no choice but to sell a priceless Gainsborough picture that has been in his family since 1750. How can he pay his bills, protect the birthright of his heirs, and watch out for the welfare of his tenants?

What assertion from the list below is supported by the passage?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Public protests against its closure are mentioned in paragraph 2.

Edenshire is a county that spans roughly 20 miles from north to south and twice that distance from east to west. The single town in the county, Merryburgh, governs the only crossing point over the east-flowing Eagle River. Merryburgh is located in the county's center. Before reaching the sea, it flows for 50 kilometers outside the county line. Merryburgh is home to almost a third of the population, but the bulk lives in unincorporated communities and rural farms.

The county's manufacturing sector is somewhat small. In Edenshire, two-fifths of the adult population work on farms or in forests, but around one-quarter of all Edenshire individuals must find employment in Northgateshire, a neighboring county. The majority of these people work in retail sales or as factory workers. Despite widespread objections to the loss of this valuable asset, Merryburgh's unprofitable medieval market will soon be shut down.

Three-quarters of the county are owned by Lord Edendale, the main employer. Like his forebears, he has never agreed to sell any properties. He feels it is his obligation to protect the history of his family for future generations. Lord Edendale's father passed away two years ago, leaving behind his fortune as well as a sizable inheritance tax obligation. Lord Edendale has to raise money by selling off property. He recently turned down a substantial offer to sell prime agricultural property so that an industrial complex could be built on it. Although he feared it would impair the modest but burgeoning tourist economy and harm the fishing industry by contaminating the river, doing this would have allowed him to pay off his debts. He has no choice but to sell a priceless Gainsborough picture that has been in his family since 1750. How can he pay his bills, protect the birthright of his heirs, and watch out for the welfare of his tenants?

The paragraph leads to the following conclusion:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
According to paragraph 3, Lord Edendale was hit with a large inheritance tax liability upon the passing of his father.

Comments are closed.

Related Content
Open