Free Practice Test for the PSAT/NMSQT Exam (Updated 2021)

PSAT NMSQT Practice Test

 


The PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. It is important to remember that the PSAT doesn’t impact a student’s college admissions applications, but mainly serves as the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship. Good PSAT scores are being used to evaluate and identify potential National Merit Scholars. Many students take the PSAT/NMSQT in hopes that they will acquire scholarship money to secure their studies in college.

PSAT/NMSQT Test Structure and Format

One of the significant steps to ace the PSAT/NMSQT test is to become attuned to the structure and format of the exam. The PSAT/NMSQT, like any standardized examination, can be predictable. The purpose of familiarizing yourself with the test structure becomes beneficial in terms of finding the right approach when answering the questions on the exam.

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The PSAT/NMSQT test consists of two sections: Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. The latter is split into two categories which are Reading Test and a Writing & Language Test. To help you studying for the PSAT exam format better, please refer to the table we’ve outlined below:

                                                        PSAT/NMSQT Test Structure and Format
Subject AreaNumber of QuestionsAllotted Time
Reading47 questions60 minutes
Writing & Language44 questions35 minutes
Math48 questions70 minutes
Total139 questions165 minutes (2 hrs and 45 mins)

PSAT/NMSQT Scoring System

The PSAT/NMSQT scoring system is a little bit confusing, especially if you’re not familiar with exam scoring methods. Moreover, it’s not impossible to understand it clearly.

For the PSAT/NMSQT scoring, you will receive a score that ranges from 10-40 on each of the three subject areas. Other than that, you will also receive a score ranging from 160-170 for the two main test sections (Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and for Math). In addition to this set of section scores, your total PSAT/NMSQT score is then calculated based on the sum of the two area scores and will range from 320-1520.

Did you lose track? No problem. To help you get a good understanding of the PSAT/NMSQT scoring system, we’ve created a quick overview of its specifics using the table below for your reference:

                                                              PSAT/NMSQT Scoring System Overview

PSAT/NMSQT Score

Description

Why it matters?

Evidence-Based Reading & Writing Score

Score range: 160 to 170

1 out of 2 section scores

●     Assesses and identifies areas of improvement.

●     Determines what specific category a student needs to focus on.

Mathematics

Score range: 160 to 170

1 out of 2 section scores

●     Evaluates quantitative skills.

●     Serves as the primary block to determine subject knowledge and performance.

Total Score

Score range: 320 to 1520

The sum of the 2 section scores.

●     Helps to anticipate possible SAT score.

●     Shows percentile ranking.

●     Determines the chance of acquiring a National Merit Scholarship.

What is a good PSAT score?

Since the PSAT total score ranges from 320-1520, the average PSAT score would be around 920, which is equivalent to getting 460 in Mathematics and 460 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. Furthermore, if you’re planning to acquire a scholarship, you should get a score of 1420-1480.

When do PSAT scores 2022 come out?

After the exam in October, the PSAT/NMSQT scores normally come out in December.

Getting Started with the PSAT/NMSQT Test

The PSAT/NMSQT is given every year in mid-October at every high school institution. Keep in mind that the PSAT/NMSQT is not administered at a testing center. For complete information about the PSAT/NMSQT, you may ask your school counselor about the PSAT test dates to successfully prepare for it in advance.

Why is the PSAT important?

#1 Excellent Preparation for the SAT

Since the PSAT/NMSQT serves as the preliminary test for the SAT, the test will be very beneficial for your preparation for the official SAT exam. The PSAT is actually 15 minutes shorter than the SAT. While it contains the same types of content questions (Math, Reading, and Writing), the PSAT does not contain an Essay section.

#2 Gain Opportunity to Acquire Scholarship Programs

One of the best things about the PSAT is it serves as the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship Program. Other than the possibility of acquiring tuition for college, you will also receive recognition from the National Merit Scholarship program that you can add to your college application credentials.

#3 Stand Out in College

The PSAT/NMSQT can help you stand out when it comes to your college application, as this will give you a strong advantage among other applicants. In fact, many colleges and universities encourage high-scoring students to apply to their institution. Thus, a great score on the PSAT/NMSQT can help you get noticed by college sharks and even benefit you in terms of paying application fees, which can potentially be waived because of your outstanding PSAT score.

Note: The top 50,000 PSAT scorers are recognized by the National Merit Scholarship program and are sent individual letters of commendation. Take note that the eligibility for the National Merit Scholarships is exclusively offered to junior high school students. Out of the 50,000 top scorers, an approximate number of 10,000 students share more than $47 million in National Merit Scholarship money.

Best PSAT Prep Course

       • Best Online PSAT Prep Course – PrepScholar
       • Best Live PSAT Prep Classes – Kaplan
       • Best PSAT Tutoring Online – Princeton PSAT Review
       • Best PSAT Course Instructors – Kranse Institute

PSAT/NMSQT Study Guide & Preparation

As we all know by now, the PSAT/NMSQT has 2 major sections, wherein one of the components is divided into two subtests. To give you comprehensive information that will serve as your study guide for the PSAT test, we’ve outlined the following information below for your reference:

PSAT/NMSQT Math

The PSAT Math test is broken into two parts: 1.) Calculator section and 2.) No-calculator section. To give you an overview of what the Math will look like on the test, refer to the table below:

                                                                  PSAT/NMSQT Math Test
Subject DetailsCalculator SectionNo-Calculator SectionTotal
Duration45 minutes25 minutes70 minutes
Multiple-choice27 questions13 questions40 questions
Grid-in448
Total311748

Note: The PSAT Math covers the following topics: Heart of Algebra, Problem Solving and Data Analysis, Passport to Advanced Math, and Additional Topics in Math.

PSAT/NMSQT Reading Test

The PSAT/NMSQT Reading Test focuses on your comprehension and reasoning abilities presented through challenging extended prose passages. For a quick overview, check out the table below:

                                                                     PSAT/NMSQT Reading Test
Timing60 minutes
Questions47 passage-based multiple-choice questions
Passages4 single passages; 1 set of paired passages
Passage Length500-750 words per passage or passage set

Note: The Reading Test passages will be drawn out from the U.S. and World Literature, History/Social Studies, and Science.

PSAT/NMSQT Writing Test

The PSAT/NMSQT Writing and Language Test focuses on your ability to edit and revise erroneous texts from a variety of content areas,

                                                                        PSAT/NMSQT Writing Test
Timing35 minutes
Questions44 passage-based multiple-choice questions
Passages4 single passages with 11 questions each
Passage Length400-550 words per passage

PSAT NMSQT Questions and Answers

Since the PSAT total score ranges from 320-1520, the average PSAT score would be around 920, which is equivalent to getting 460 in Mathematics and 460 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. Furthermore, if you’re planning to acquire a scholarship, you should get a score of 1420-1480.

The PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. It is important to remember that the PSAT doesn’t impact a student’s college admissions applications, but mainly serves as the qualifying test for the National Merit Scholarship. Good PSAT scores are being used to evaluate and identify potential National Merit Scholars. Many students take the PSAT/NMSQT in hopes that they will acquire scholarship money to secure their studies in college.

The PSAT is a two-hour and 45-minute test that assesses your reading, writing, and math skills. 

The PSAT test consists of two sections: Math and Evidence-Based Reading and Writing. The latter is split into two categories which are Reading Test and a Writing & Language Test.

PSAT stand for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test.

A good PSAT score falls between 1420-1480, as this score range can grant you a spot to qualify for the National Merit Scholarship Program. Furthermore, the average PSAT score is 920, which falls between the PSAT score range 320 – 1520.

Each of the three examinations (Reading, Writing & Language, and Math) will yield a score ranging from 8 to 38, as well as a score ranging from 160 to 760 for Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and Math. Your overall PSAT score, which is derived by adding your two area scores together, will range from 320 to 1520.

The PSAT is given to sophomores and juniors in high school in October, and it is only given once a year.

The average PSAT score is in the 50th percentile, or “Ok.” This score ranges from 910 to 920, with a 470 in Evidence-Based Reading and Writing and a 460 in Math.

Even with an average PSAT score, you will not be eligible for the National Merit Scholarship.

The average PSAT score for high school sophomores is 934.

On the PSAT, high school juniors average a score of 1014.

“No,” colleges say, “the PSAT is irrelevant.” A poor PSAT score has little bearing on your prospects of getting into college.

The PSAT is considered to be less difficult than the SAT.

The highest PSAT score is a composite score of 1520.

A composite score of 1050-1060 on the PSAT is an excellent score for a sophomore based on logic.

In early December, PSAT scores are usually issued over a three-day period, with exact release dates differing based on which state you took the test in.

Juniors’ 75th percentile scores in each section range from 560 to 590, totaling roughly 1150.

The test is divided into four sections: the Reading Test (60 minutes, 47 questions), the Math Test (60 minutes, 50 questions), and the Writing Test (60 minutes, 50 questions). The Writing and Language Test consists of 44 questions and takes 35 minutes to complete. No calculator portion of the math test – 25 minutes, 17 questions.

Being an attentive student who is ready and motivated to study in school is the greatest method to prepare for the PSAT. After all, the purpose of the PSAT (and, for that matter, the SAT) is to see how well you understand the reading, writing, and math topics you learned in high school. Being an excellent student would undoubtedly aid you in achieving a high PSAT score.

Each section is graded on a scale of 160–760, with a “perfect” score of 1520 being the highest. There are also subscores, test scores, and cross-test scores.

Your PSAT results are normally available in December, six to eight weeks after you take the test. The 2019 PSAT results were announced online on December 9-11, 2019. Students received their scores on different dates depending on where they took the test.

Go to the website to check your score and assess the total score, reading and writing score, and math score.

No, the PSAT is not as difficult as the SAT. It contains fewer questions, is shorter, and does not include an optional essay.

The PSAT does not count for college admissions, but it is required to be considered for the National Merit Scholarship. While you shouldn’t be concerned by the PSAT, you also shouldn’t dismiss it. Use the PSAT as a warm-up for the SAT and ACT, as well as a helpful compass for your college admissions path.

Any college does not require the PSAT. The PSAT results aren’t even sent to colleges. The main purpose to take the PSAT as a junior is to prepare for the SAT and/or to see if you have a good chance of winning a National Merit, National Achievement, or National Hispanic scholarship.

Colleges will never inquire about your PSAT scores, and you will never be required to report them.

PSAT with breaks will take 2 hours and 45 minutes.

Most secondary schools in the United States administer the PSAT/NMSQT (National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test), administer to their children in 1st grade. In addition, some high schools Students in 9th and 10th grades can take the PSAT/NMSQT.

The PSAT/NMSQT is neither mandatory nor required (on a national level), college acceptance.

99th percentile and above (“outstanding”): 1370-1520 for 10th grade students taking the test (either the PSAT 10 or the PSAT/NMSQT). The 90th percentile (“excellent”) is 1180. 1060 is the 75th percentile (“solid”).

The PSAT Selection Index is used to determine whether or not a student is eligible for the National Merit Scholarship Program. The PSAT test is divided into three pieces, each of which is scored separately. In each area, the scale is graded from 20 to 80. Exam questions can be found and used on a variety of test preparation websites.

PSAT scores are available as early as 5 a.m. Eastern (or 2 am Pacific Time). You may receive your results later in the day, depending on your account and test date.

Every October, high school students take the PSAT. In many instances, students in grades 9 through 11 are permitted to travel across the country. Register for the test, but the PSAT is especially crucial for high school students. 

The PSAT is a standardized test that sophomores and juniors in high school take before taking the SAT. The PSAT is a “preliminary” test that helps students prepare for the SAT’s subject and difficulty level.

To sign up, check with a counselor at your school or at a nearby school.

In high school, students can take the PSAT up to three times. The test is also only available once a year. You can only sign up for one test date each year, even if your institution provides numerous test dates. The test is often taken in tenth and eleventh grade, although you could take it in ninth grade for extra practice.

There is a $14 price to take the PSAT; however, schools may charge an additional fee to cover administrative costs; fees may vary by institution.

In general, a score of 1550 or higher will give you a good chance of getting into the Ivy Leagues.

A perfect score on the PSAT with this range is 1520.

In the 2015-16 school year, the PSAT 10 was introduced as a practice SAT exam. It is SAT-aligned, which means it contains the same question types and Reading, Writing, and Math portions as the SAT. Its scores range from 320 to 1520 on a total scale.

The PSAT 8/9 is a test administered throughout the school day to eight and ninth grade students. The SAT Suite of Assessments begins with this test.

The National Merit Scholarship Foundation’s Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test The College Board’s (PSAT/M11) is a nationally recognized standardized test, and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (National Marine Science Center) in the United States.

The exact PSAT score required for National Merit consideration varies from year to year and by state, however Semifinalists are consistently selected from the top 1% of students (about 16,000 juniors). Around 15,000 kids from this category go on to become National Merit Finalists, with roughly 8,000 of them winning scholarship money.

The following is a list of items to bring to the PSAT.

  • Email address (optional)
  • A photo ID
  • Social security number (optional)
  • An acceptable calculator with extra batteries
  • No. 2 pencils with erasers
  • A watch to keep track of time (watches with alarms are not allowed)

There aren’t any essays on PSAT.

An good result, on the other hand, is one that exceeds the 90th percentile, or 90 percent of test takers. According to this logic, a decent PSAT score for a sophomore is one that is greater than 1060, an OK score is one that is greater than 920, and an excellent score is one that is greater than 1180.

They don’t offer online examinations; instead, they offer traditional paper-based assessments through their test centers.

The PSAT and SAT are nearly identical tests. The PSAT is fifteen minutes shorter than the SAT, does not require an essay, and has a slightly different scoring scale. The PSAT features the same question types as the SAT and tests the same knowledge areas. You are preparing for both tests by studying for the SAT!

In the fall of their sophomore or junior year, the majority of students take the PSAT at their high school.

The PSAT is a 70-minute, 48-question examination. There are two pieces to it. There are 40 multiple choice questions and 8 grid-in questions in this mixed-format test. For the first section, students have 45 minutes and the option of utilizing a calculator (31 questions). They have 25 minutes to complete the second section and are not permitted to use a calculator (17 questions).

In 10-point increments, the overall PSAT scoring scale ranges from 320 to 1520.

On exam day, the PSAT accepts just three types of calculators:

  • Four-function
  • Scientific
  • Graphing

The PSAT is commonly referred to as a “preliminary” or “practice” SAT. This is due to the fact that the test is eerily identical to the actual SAT exam. Before taking the SAT, most people take the PSAT. Occasionally, the PSAT is referred to as the NMSQT, or “National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test,” because students who do well on the exam may be eligible for a National Merit Scholarship. Originally, the acronym SAT stood for “Scholastic Aptitude Test,” but as the test has evolved over the years, the original meaning has been dropped. Regardless of the name change, the test’s importance among students has remained same. Students take the exam to demonstrate their “readiness for college work,” demonstrating to institutions that they are capable of functioning well if accepted.

Yes, you’ll receive an email when your scores are available if you indicated your email address on your answer sheet on test day.

The PSAT, or Preliminary SAT, is an exam that most students take in their junior year. If you want to take it as a freshman or sophomore, you can do so, and you can take it numerous times.

The PSAT does not count for college admissions, but it is required to be considered for the National Merit Scholarship. Some of the highest-scoring students may be eligible for a scholarship.

PSAT scores are compared to SAT scores on the same scale. The notion is that a score of 650 on the PSAT is equivalent to a score of 650 on the SAT. PSAT and SAT scores can share a concordance to the extent that they can be used interchangeably.

In most cases, you’ll need a PSAT score in the top 1% of your state’s population. The specific score cutoff you’ll need to meet, on the other hand, varies from state to state and year to year.

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