FREE SGNA General Patient Care Questions and Answers

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GI unit-specific hazards include:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
GI unit-specific hazards include radiation, medications, and lasers. In the GI unit, healthcare professionals may be exposed to radiation during certain procedures such as fluoroscopy. Medications used in the GI unit, such as sedatives and anesthesia, can pose risks if not administered or monitored properly. Laser procedures may also be performed in the GI unit, which can present hazards if not handled with caution. Therefore, all of the options listed (radiation, medications, and laser) are considered specific hazards in the GI unit.

Unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer, multi-use vials that have been accessed and used should be discarded within which of the following time periods?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Unless otherwise specified by the manufacturer, multi-use vials that have been accessed and used should be discarded within 28 days. Multi-use vials contain preservatives but can become contaminated with bacteria and provide no protection against viruses. Multi-use vials should be reserved for only one patient whenever possible and should be maintained in a separate space from the treatment area to prevent inadvertent contamination. A new needle and syringe should be used each time the vial is accessed.

Which of the following is a reversal agent for excessive sedation of a patient who has received a benzodiazepine?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Romazicon (Flumazenil) is a reversal agent for excessive sedation of a patient who has received a benzodiazepine although it does not reverse respiratory depression. Romazicon is administered IV with a beginning dose of 0.2 mg over 30 seconds with repeat doses at one-minute intervals as needed. The second dose is 0.3 mg and the third and subsequent doses are 0.5 mg. Epinephrine is used for emergent treatment of asystole, VF, and PEA; naloxone, for opioids; and N-acetylcysteine, for acetaminophen overdose.

A 76-year-old female ate E. coli (0157:H7) contaminated vegetables and developed abdominal cramps and non-bloody diarrhea for 48 hours after which the diarrhea became bloody for 4 days. The patient is MOST at risk for developing which of the following?

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Explanation:
If a 76-year-old female ate E.coli (0157.H7) contaminated vegetables and developed abdominal cramps and non-bloody diarrhea that persisted for 48 hours after which diarrhea became bloody for 4 days, the patient is at risk for developing hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can lead to renal failure. Children under 5 and older adults are most likely to develop HUS. HUS is characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure.

A patient taking metoclopramide has been prescribed haloperidol. For which of the following does this drug combination put the patient at increased risk?

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Explanation:
If a patient taking haloperidol has been prescribed metoclopramide, this drug combination puts the patient at increased risk of developing tardive dyskinesia. Both drugs can cause uncontrollable movement disorders and this combination potentiates the effect and can lead to life-threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The risk of developing tardive dyskinesia with metoclopramide increases with treatment extending beyond 12 weeks. Metoclopramide may also interact with numerous other drugs, including other antipsychotic drugs and phenothiazines.

The nurse is using the BVMGR (beliefs, values, meanings, goals, and relationships) rubric for implementing spiritual care. To which of the following do these aspects apply?

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Explanation:
If the nurse is using the BVMGR (beliefs, values, meanings, goals, and relationships) rubric for implementing spiritual care, these aspects apply to the assessment of the patient. That is, the nurse should try to understand the patient's BVMGR and should not let personal BVMGR intrude and should avoid any indication of proselytizing when the nurse's BVMGR is at odds with the patient. While the nurse may not share the patient's belief system, the nurse should always seek to understand and show respect for it.

The most frequent exogenous infection associated with endoscopic transmission is:

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Explanation:
The most frequent exogenous infection associated with endoscopic transmission is caused by gram-negative bacteria or mycobacteria. Endoscopic procedures involve the use of instruments that come into contact with the patient's body, and if proper cleaning and disinfection protocols are not followed, these bacteria can be transmitted from one patient to another. It is crucial to adhere to strict infection control measures, including proper cleaning and disinfection of endoscopic equipment, to prevent the transmission of these bacteria and ensure patient safety. While hepatitis C virus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can also be transmitted through contaminated instruments, gram-negative bacteria or mycobacteria are the most frequently associated with endoscopic transmission.

Improving quality in the patient care setting should be based on:

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Explanation:
Improving quality in the patient care setting should focus on improving the process rather than just correcting the immediate problem or finding someone to blame. By improving the process, healthcare organizations can identify and address the root causes of problems, implement evidence-based practices, and make sustainable changes that lead to better outcomes for patients. This approach involves analyzing the entire care delivery system, identifying areas for improvement, and implementing strategies to enhance efficiency, effectiveness, and patient safety. Regulatory rules may provide guidelines, but improving the process goes beyond compliance and aims to continuously enhance the quality of care provided.

The patient has the right to:

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Explanation:
Patients have the right to respect and dignity, which means they should be treated with kindness and empathy, and without discrimination. They also have the right to privacy and confidentiality, which means their personal and medical information should be kept confidential and only shared with authorized individuals. Additionally, patients have the right to safety and security, which includes receiving care in a safe environment and being protected from harm. Therefore, all of the options listed (respect and dignity, privacy and confidentiality, safety and security) are rights that patients are entitled to.

The most common infectious agents in the clinical setting are:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Bacteria are the most common infectious agents in the clinical setting. They are single-celled microorganisms that can cause a wide range of infections, including respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, and gastrointestinal infections. Bacterial infections can be treated with antibiotics, but it is important to use them appropriately to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance. While viruses, fungi, helminths, and protozoa can also cause infections, bacteria are the most prevalent in the clinical setting.

The gastroenterology unit has experienced an outbreak of Clostridium difficile infections involving 10 patients over a 2-week period. In order to reduce further transmission of the infection, on which of the following should the staff should concentrate efforts?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
If the gastroenterology unit has experienced an outbreak of Clostridium difficile infections involving 10 patients over a two-week period, in order the reduce transmission of the infection, the nurse and staff members should concentrate efforts on the utilization of proper contact precautions and hand hygiene as the infection is easily spread through contaminated hands. The spores can remain viable on environmental surfaces for long periods of time. Housekeeping procedures should also be reviewed.

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