FREE NSC Nutrition Interventions Questions and Answers

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Lipodystrophy is prone to occur in patients who take the anti-HIV medication Zerit. A disorder known as lipodystrophy is defined by aberrant fat distribution throughout the body, which can cause changes in the form of the body and the buildup of fat in certain places. The patient may experience major physical and psychological effects from this side effect, which is frequently linked to the usage of Zerit.

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In more than 75% of instances, chronic alcohol misuse is the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis can also be caused by trauma, drugs, and illnesses affecting the biliary tract. When pancreatitis starts, a systemic immuno-inflammatory response (SIR) that is characterized by severe pain and cytokine production happens. Patients rapidly lose nutritional status as a result of becoming hypermetabolic and catabolism of skeletal muscle. Early enteral feeding has been shown to improve gut integrity and blood flow to the gut, which results in the release of bile salts and secretory IgA to help shield the gut from damage. The ideal location for enteral feeding is beneath the ligament of Treitz with a nasojejunal tube. A regular formula can be started in this situation. An elemental or semi-elemental low-fat formula can be tried if the patient is intolerant of this kind of formula. Parenteral feeding is used as a final option. It is not possible to begin an oral diet until the pain has subsided, which usually happens 5-7 days following diagnosis.

The phenylketonuria test that is used to identify

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Phenylketonuria (PKU), a hereditary condition affecting the body's capacity to break down the amino acid phenylalanine, is diagnosed by the Guthrie test. In order to perform this test, a newborn baby's blood sample is collected and its levels of phenylalanine are checked. If the readings are high, the baby can have PKU, in which case more examinations and medical care are needed. The remaining variables (genotype, VPR) are not pertinent to PKU diagnosis.

The largest negative impact gastrointestinal procedures have on a patient's nutritional state is

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The surgical excision of a segment of the ileum, the last segment of the small intestine, is known as an ileal resection. The ileum is in charge of absorbing vital nutrients such vitamin B12, bile salts, and other fat-soluble vitamins, so this operation may have a negative impact on a person's nutritional state. The body may find it difficult to absorb these vital nutrients without a functioning ileum, which could result in deficits and possible consequences. As such, ileal resection may have a substantial effect on the nutritional condition of patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery.

The following are the liver cirrhosis's clinical symptoms.

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Damage and scarring of the liver tissue are hallmarks of cirrhosis of the liver. The abnormal build-up of fluid in the abdominal cavity, known as ascites, is frequently observed in patients with cirrhosis as a result of elevated portal vein pressure. Conversely, hypoalbuminemia, or low blood albumin levels, can result from impaired liver function in cirrhosis. Ascites and hypoalbuminemia are two common clinical symptoms seen in people with cirrhosis of the liver.

When a patient consumes anti-HIV Zerit, it may result in:

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Zerit is an anti-HIV medication that may cause lipodystrophy in certain patients. The term "lipodystrophy" describes a disorder where the body's regular distribution of fat causes aberrant changes in body composition, including the accumulation of fat in certain places. This adverse reaction is frequently linked to Zerit use and can have serious negative effects on the patient's physical and mental health.

The purpose of cystic fibrosis treatment is to:

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Replacing pancreatic enzymes is the goal of treating cystic fibrosis in order to improve the absorption of fat and protein. This is critical because malnutrition can result from the inability of people with cystic fibrosis to digest and absorb nutrients. By giving these enzymes, the metabolism of fat and protein can be enhanced, which can help treat the nutritional deficits that are frequently linked to the illness.

What is the LEAST likely cause of diarrhea in a hospitalized patient on enteral nutrition?

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Diarrhea can be brought on by the bacterium Clostridium difficile, particularly in hospitalized patients on enteral nutrition. But the question poses the LEAST likely reason of diarrhea. Among the things mentioned, deficiency in nutrients, consumption of soluble fiber, and blood loss can all potentially aggravate diarrhea in a hospitalized patient. Since Clostridium difficile is the least likely cause of diarrhea in this situation, Clostridium difficile is the correct answer.

Regarding the low amount of serum albumin, which of these is untrue?

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Serum albumin levels below a certain threshold are not indicative of esophageal reflux. A protein called serum albumin, which is mostly made by the liver, aids in preserving the blood's osmotic pressure. Conditions like nephrotic syndrome, a kidney disease, and kwashiorkor, a severe form of malnutrition, are known to have low serum albumin levels. Additionally, ascites—a buildup of fluid in the abdominal cavity—may be linked to it. It is not, however, a diagnostic sign for esophageal reflux, which is usually determined by other means, including pH monitoring or endoscopy.

Moreover, impaired glucose tolerance is distinguished by:

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The condition known as impaired glucose tolerance occurs when the body is unable to adequately manage blood sugar levels, which results in blood glucose levels that are higher than normal. The range of 100–125 mg/dl for fasting plasma glucose is one feature of impaired glucose tolerance. This indicates that the range is reached when a person's blood sugar is tested following an overnight fast. This suggests that the body may be at risk of getting diabetes due to its inability to process glucose efficiently.

With one exception, all of these are mediated by the digestive hormone gastrin.

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The digestive hormone called gastrin is in charge of encouraging the stomach's production of gastric acid. It also causes the gallbladder to contract more forcefully and secrete more hydrochloric acid (HCL). It may also result in an elevation of the esophageal sphincter's pressure. Nevertheless, it has no impact on the stomach's ability to produce pepsinogen. The enzyme pepsin, which aids in the digestion of proteins, is produced from pepsinogen. Consequently, "reduced of pepsinogen production by the stomach" is the proper response.

Treatment for hypertension frequently involves the use of:

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The DASH diet is the right response. Changes in lifestyle, including dietary adjustments, can help manage hypertension, or high blood pressure. For those with hypertension, the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet is advised. It places a focus on lowering cholesterol, saturated fats, and sodium while increasing the consumption of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low-fat dairy products. It has been demonstrated that eating a nutritious, well-balanced diet lowers blood pressure and lowers the risk of cardiovascular illnesses. As an antihistamine, chlorphenamine is not used to treat hypertension. It is malaria, not hypertension, that is treated or prevented with antimalarial drugs. For hypertension, "bondoment" is not an approved treatment.

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