FREE Inpatient Obstetric Nurse Trivia Questions and Answers

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When hypertension without proteinuria appears after 20 weeks of pregnancy and continues for 6 weeks into the postpartum period, it is referred to as

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Explanation:
Gestational hypertension is defined as hypertension without proteinuria that appears after 20 weeks of pregnancy and lasts for 6 weeks into the postpartum period (AKA transient hypertension and pregnancy-induced hypertension). The classification of hypertension is changed from gestational to chronic if it lasts longer than 12 weeks postpartum (without the onset of preeclampsia) or if it started earlier than 20 weeks. Thus, the postpartum period is the only time that hypertension can be definitively diagnosed.

How many weeks do post-term pregnancy last?

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Explanation:
More than 42 weeks, or 294 days, have passed since the previous menstrual cycle, which is considered post-term. During labor and delivery, there are increased risks for both the mother and the fetus. Because the fetus is large for gestational age (LGA) or macrosomic, labor is frequently induced, and delivery is more likely to involve forceps or vacuum assistance. Cephalopelvic malpresentation or disproportion may warrant a cesarean section.

The condition known as fetal scalp edema, which develops when the skull presses against the cervix, is

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Explanation:
Caput succedaneum: Fetal scalp edema brought on by head pressure against the cervix (or from the suction of vacuum-assisted delivery). Within the first 12 hours after delivery, a soft swelling that crosses suture lines usually goes away. Bleeding between the periosteum and the skull is known as a cephalohematoma. The edema typically does not cross suture lines, is firm, and most frequently affects parietal areas. Molding: The suture lines where the cranium bones overlap. Within a week, this condition usually gets better.

The fetus is at risk when a pregnant woman has organic mercury poisoning (methyl mercury) yet shows little symptoms.

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Explanation:
The fetus is at a high risk of damage when a pregnant woman has organic mercury poisoning (methyl mercury) but few symptoms. The fetus may suffer severe effects even though the mother may show minimal signs of organic mercury poisoning because the fetus is more vulnerable to mercury than an adult. Because mercury hinders the growth of the central nervous system, the child may experience severe neurological abnormalities, such as diminished motor skills, memory, thinking, and visuospatial and attention span.

The main danger of having a midline episiotomy is

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Explanation:
Despite the fact that midline episiotomies are frequently performed to prevent lacerations, the main risk associated with them is laceration. Furthermore, small wounds often heal more quickly and with less discomfort than episiotomy. The rectal sphincter and mucosa may be injured to a third- or fourth-degree laceration as a result of the episiotomy. Episiotomy should not be performed frequently to hasten birth, although it may be necessary if the delivery is aided by forceps or the descent is halted. Episiotomies can also be performed by a mediolateral incision, albeit this is uncommon in the US.

The kind of human milk that gives a newborn passive immunity is

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Explanation:
Colostrum, which the breast produces for the first two to four days, uses a lot of immunoglobulins to give the newborn passive immunity (antibodies). Although colostrum, which is produced in small amounts (teaspoons), is thick and buttery in appearance, has a higher protein content than mature milk (thanks to antibodies), is lower in fats and carbohydrates, and is sufficient for the newborn's small stomach. Additionally acting as a laxative and encouraging meconium passage, colostrum.

What treatment is recommended for a pregnant Graves' disease patient?

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Explanation:
Propylthiouracil is the preferred treatment for a pregnant Graves' disease patient. The medicine may cause fetal hypoparathyroidism, hence the lowest dose feasible is used when giving it to patients. However, because it results in aplasia cutis (scalp disorder) in the fetus, methimazole is usually avoided. Since radioactive iodine could harm the developing thyroid in the fetus, it should be avoided during pregnancy. The thyroid gland can be removed during the second trimester if surgery is required.

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