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I don't believe I ____ the door when we went.

Correct! Wrong!

Use the gerund after remember if you are recalling a former event (memory), and the infinitive if there is something you need to keep in mind.

If she doesn't reply, try ____ her on her cellphone.

Correct! Wrong!

When we do anything as an experiment to see if it aids in solving a problem that we wish to tackle, we say try doing something (gerund).
In this line, someone is trying to get in touch with someone and they can try calling to see if it works.

You should _______ . Our delay!

Correct! Wrong!

After would rather or had better, use the infinitive without the preposition to.

Before we get there, he advises ______ some cash.

Correct! Wrong!

-ing is added after recommending.

I'm sorry, but I'm unable ______.

Correct! Wrong!

After some phrases, such as "can't help," add the -ing.
You cannot quit doing anything if you are unable to stop.

When I was a child, I recall _______ here.

Correct! Wrong!

Use the gerund after remember if you are recalling a former event (memory), and the infinitive if there is something you need to keep in mind.

If you don't mind, I'd prefer ____ my own car.

Correct! Wrong!

We can use either the gerund or the to + infinitive after like, love, hate, or prefer (the gerund is more common in British English).
However, we should use the infinitive after would like, would love, would detest, or would prefer.

I made an effort ____ my eyes open, but I ultimately dozed off.

Correct! Wrong!

When we make an effort to complete a task that we may or may not succeed in, we say that we are trying to do it.

Yesterday, I forgotĀ ______ you. I apologize.

Correct! Wrong!

When there is something you need to remember to do, use forget to do. The most frequent usage is this.
When you can't recall a recent occurrence or circumstance, use forget doing (it has to do with recollections).

They had issues _____ our home.

Correct! Wrong!

After some statements, such as "have difficulties," "have difficulty (in)," "have a hard/difficult time," etc., the gerund is used.

I want you to stop _______ that.

Correct! Wrong!

When we stop completing one task to begin another, we say we are stopping to do something.
When we quit doing something, we use the phrase (on that occasion of forever).

You should _____ for your hair. It goes on and on.

Correct! Wrong!

When the meaning is passive, we use the expression need doing. Something must be done. = "Action must be taken."
You need to cut your hair.
You should cut your hair.

At your age, _____ was my favorite pastime.

Correct! Wrong!

When the verb is the sentence's subject, we employ the gerund.

My mother forbids me from ____ with you.

Correct! Wrong!

Make/let someone do something is how we say it (infinitive without to).

Do you mind _____ the window?

Correct! Wrong!

After mind or would mind, use -ing.

Together, we discussed _______ for the upcoming summer.

Correct! Wrong!

When the verb comes after a preposition or a phrasal verb, the gerund is used.

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