FREE EEG Routine Questions and Answers

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Waves that are regular and resemble sine waves.

Correct! Wrong!

Regular waves that mimic sine waves are called sinusoidal waves. They repeat in a smooth, regular rhythm with a constant amplitude and frequency. Numerous natural phenomena, including sound, electromagnetic, and water waves, frequently exhibit sinusoidal waves. The best phrase, among those provided, to characterize regular waves that approximate sine waves is sinusoidal.

A wave with two or more components pointing in separate directions.

Correct! Wrong!

A wave with two or more components pointing in distinct directions is said to be polyphasic. This indicates that the wave is made up of various phases or parts that are traveling in various directions. The correct answer is indicated by the fact that it is the only choice that appropriately depicts a wave with many components pointing in various directions.

Wave with a single deviation from the baseline, either up or down.

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Monophasic waves have only one deflection from the baseline, either up or down. This indicates that there is only one phase or motion direction for the wave. Unlike polyphasic waves, it does not exhibit many phases or deflections. Paroxysmal describes abrupt, intense episodes, transient describes something that is fleeting or short-lived, and epileptiform describes waveforms that resemble those observed in epilepsy.

Waveforms with pronounced contours that are deemed aberrant.

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The brain's electrical activity suddenly and briefly changes during sharp transient waveforms. People with epilepsy frequently exhibit these waveforms during ictal phases or seizures. Their outlines are clear and sharp, setting them apart from other waveform types like interictal or transient waveforms. These aberrant waveforms, which are often referred to as epileptiform activity, are indicative of aberrant brain activity and can be used to diagnose and track epilepsy.

Wave with a single deviation from the baseline, either up or down.

Correct! Wrong!

Monophasic waves have only one deflection from the baseline, either up or down. This indicates that there is just one phase or direction of deflection for the wave. Unlike the other alternatives, it does not contain many phases or deflections (transient, polyphasic, paroxysmal, epileptiform).

A wave with two or more components pointing in separate directions.

Correct! Wrong!

A wave with two or more components pointing in distinct directions is said to be polyphasic. This indicates that the wave is made up of various phases or parts that are traveling in various directions. It could consist of waves or phases that are both positive and negative and are traveling in opposing directions. This phrase is frequently used in relation to brain waves or electrical activity, where polyphasic waves may be a sign of diseased or aberrant activity in the brain.

Waveforms connected to and unrelated from clinical seizure symptoms.

Correct! Wrong!

Waveforms indicative of epilepsy or seizure activity are referred to as "epileptiforms". When performing an electroencephalogram (EEG), a test used to identify and track seizures, these waves can be seen. Abnormal electrical discharges in the brain called epileptiform waveforms are frequently linked to clinical seizure symptoms including convulsions or loss of consciousness. Consequently, the best term to characterize waveforms linked to clinical seizure symptoms is "epileptiform".

Pattern of Electrographic Seizures.

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The word "ictal" describes the time during a seizure when the brain's aberrant electrical activity results in the typical seizure symptoms. This includes the actual seizure activity itself, which is represented as an electrographic seizure pattern on an electroencephalogram (EEG). The other options are not limited to the ictal period; they include "Interictal" (the interval in between seizures), "Sharp transient" (a type of EEG waveform), "Irregular Activity" (a generic description of abnormal brain activity), and "Epileptiform" (abnormal EEG patterns associated with epilepsy).

Something that sticks out from the crowd.

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Something that is transitory or brief is referred to as transient. The best response in this question is "transient" since an event that sticks out against the background is probably something that happens short or momentarily.

What pattern does opening and closing the eyes affect?

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The Posterior Dominant Rhythm is impacted by opening and closing the eyes. The electrical brain activity pattern known as the Posterior Dominant Rhythm is mostly present in the brain's posterior regions. It is usually noticeable when someone is awake and their eyes are closed; as they open their eyes, it becomes less noticeable. Therefore, opening and closing the eyes has an impact on the pattern.

Two elements that are situated on different sides of the baseline.

Correct! Wrong!

A waveform or signal that has two separate phases or components is referred to be diphasic. The two elements listed in the question are situated on different sides of the baseline in this particular situation. Since diphasic adequately represents the waveform with two phases, it is the correct response.

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