FREE CPSS Foundations of Exercise Science Questions and Answers

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Could be the training session's internal and external load.

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The internal and external load of a given training session combined represent the "Training Load." Internal load refers to the physiological and psychological stress placed on the athlete's body, while external load refers to the physical work performed during the training session. Together, they provide a comprehensive measure of the stress and strain experienced by the athlete during training.

Seyle's theory that stress causes the body to react with alarm, resistance, and tiredness

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Seyle's concept that the body responds to stress with alarm, resistance, and exhaustion is known as the "General Adaptation Syndrome." This theory describes the body's response to stressors in three stages: alarm reaction, resistance, and exhaustion.

State in which an athlete performs at maximum physical capacity without experiencing undue psychological distress or mental exhaustion.

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The condition described, where an athlete has no impairment of physical performance, no mental fatigue, or excessive psychological distress, is referred to as "readiness." It indicates that the athlete is prepared both physically and mentally for optimal performance.

The test-retest score variability.

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The variability of test-retest scores is measured by the "Coefficient of Variation." This statistic expresses the standard deviation as a percentage of the mean, providing a measure of relative variability that allows for comparison between different datasets with different means.

Positive fitness effect and negative fatigue effect, which both deteriorate with time but at different rates (fatigue doubles the rate of fitness) are what determine performance.

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The statement describes the "Fitness Fatigue Model," which explains performance as a function of positive fitness effects and negative fatigue effects, both of which decay over time but at different rates (typically with fatigue decaying at twice the rate of fitness). This model is commonly used in sports science to understand the relationship between training, recovery, and performance.

Could be the training session's internal and external load.

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The term for the smallest change in a metric for a given athlete that is likely to be of practical importance is "Smallest Worthwhile Change." This concept helps coaches and practitioners interpret changes in performance or other metrics in a meaningful way, considering factors such as measurement error and individual variability.

The idea that running at a constant speed increase and "equivalent slop" are equivalent in terms of energy consumption when accelerating.

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The principle that the energy cost of acceleration is equivalent to running at a constant speed up and down an "equivalent slope" is referred to as "Metabolic Power." This concept helps in understanding the metabolic demands of various activities and is important in sports science and exercise physiology.

The time after a disturbance in homeostasis during which, if the body is given the chance to adjust, performance is improved.

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The period following the disruption of homeostasis whereby performance is enhanced if the body is allowed to adapt is known as "Supercompensation." During this phase, the body not only returns to its pre-stress level but goes beyond it, leading to improved performance.

A method for determining if athletes are prepared to take on further workload.

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What is the name given to the point during exercise when blood lactate buildup grows quickly?

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The anaerobic threshold is the point at which the body switches from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism, leading to a rapid increase in blood lactate accumulation.

The reaction or internal load that a specific training stimulus will cause.

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The response or internal load that will occur due to a given training stimulus is referred to as "Dose-Response." This concept relates to how the body reacts to the amount or dose of a training stimulus, and how this response affects performance or adaptation.

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