FREE CEN Questions and Answers

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A 10-year-old child is being treated by the emergency department staff. He or she has a normal systolic blood pressure, a rapid heartbeat, somewhat delayed capillary refill, and chilly, pale complexion. How much shock is the child most likely experiencing?

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Wrong!

The impact of shock on systolic blood pressure is frequently used to describe shock severity. The shock is referred to as “”compensated”” when the compensatory mechanisms are active and keep the systolic blood pressure constant. Shock is categorized as “”hypotensive”” (formerly called “”decompensated””) when the mechanisms can no longer support the blood pressure.

A 24-year-old guy with gunshot wounds to his abdomen and left groin area has been transported by emergency medical services to the emergency department. His heart rate is 120 beats per minute, and his blood pressure is 84/52. His skin is pale, cold, and diaphoretic. The procedure for which the nurse should get ready is:

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Wrong!

The young man’s symptoms and gunshot wounds suggest that he has suffered from hypovolemia as a result of severe blood loss. A quick intravenous infusion of a crystalloid solution is used to treat hypovolemia.

The following are all indications of respiratory failure, WITH THE EXCEPTION

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Wrong!

Not respiratory failure, although respiratory discomfort is indicated by nasal flaring and retractions. You can recognize respiratory failure by the following symptoms: diminished air movement, central and peripheral cyanosis, decreased level of consciousness, and decreased breathing effort with late bradypnea.

All of the typical assessments listed below can be used to quickly assess a child’s neurological condition, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF:

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Wrong!

The Epworth Scale is a drowsiness test that is not typically evaluated as part of a child’s neurological examination. The neural state of a child can be assessed using the AVPU and Glasgow Coma measures. It’s important to assess the size and reaction of the pupil. (zolpidem)

A patient who is experiencing respiratory distress is receiving positive pressure ventilation through an ET tube from you. Aside from: All of the following are signs that you are breathing too quickly.

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Wrong!

Aspiration, stomach insufflation, and tension pneumothorax are latrogenic consequences of hyperventilation with an ET tube. Waveform capnography readings that are rising are a sign of effective CPR.

A patient who is in cardiogenic shock is under your care. You are aware that one of this condition’s likely causes is:

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The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is congestive heart failure. Cardiogenic shock can also be brought on by acute myocardial infarction and other cardiac disorders. Hypovolemic shock can be brought on by dehydration. Injury to the spinal cord may result in neurogenic shock. Septic shock can result from infection.

The optimum method to confirm and maintain tracheal tube position, when available, is described by the American Heart Association ACLS guidelines as:

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Wrong!

To establish and maintain ET tube position, the AHA advises using clinical evaluation and continuous waveform capnography.

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