FREE CBIC Test Question and Answers

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Which kind of vascular access device (VAD) carries the lowest risk of infection for individuals who need hemodialysis?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The arteriovenous fistula, which is best implanted in the arm as opposed to the thigh for patients who need hemodialysis, is the kind of vascular access device that poses the least risk of infection. Subclavian catheters have a significant risk of central venous thrombosis and stenosis, and catheterized patients have a 7-fold increased risk of infection. Additionally, vascular access should be maintained and AV should be established as soon as possible for individuals with chronic kidney disease.

How many air exchanges per hour should rooms have for allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients need to be in spaces with at least 12 air exchanges per hour or point-of-service HEPA filtration with a 99.97% efficiency that can filter out particles at least 3 mcm in size. Although regular environmental sampling is not necessary, air quality should be checked since patients are particularly vulnerable to Aspergillus infections. Visitors should be given instructions on proper hand washing and safety procedures, and the aseptic technique should be scrupulously upheld.

The BEST technique to use if hair removal is necessary before surgery is to:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The easiest way to remove hair if it needs to be removed for surgical treatment is to use clippers right before the incision because they produce the least trauma. Hair removal at the surgery site might not prevent SSIs and might even make infections more likely. Shaving should not be utilized as it frequently causes minor skin nicks and abrasions. Never before the incision, but right before, should any hair removal be performed.

The most efficient strategy for preventing hospital-acquired illnesses is:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Following the instructions for handwashing with soap (antimicrobial or non-antimicrobial) and water or alcohol-based hand rub is the most efficient way to control hospital-acquired illnesses. This entails washing hands before and after interacting with patients, washing your hands properly, and teaching patients and visitors the importance of handwashing. Patients should be urged to remind staff members—including doctors—to wash their hands before attending to or otherwise interacting with them. Every time your hands are obviously unclean, wash them with soap and water.

The most likely cause of mastitis in nursing mothers is:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The infant's Staphylococcus aureus colonization is the most probable cause of mastitis in nursing mothers. Within a few days of delivery, 50% of newborns have Staphylococcus aureus colonization, and these rates rise if the baby is hospitalized for an extended period of time or is kept in a NICU. Although transmission from the mother can cause colonization in the kid, this is less common. In most cases, the infant contracts the infection through breastfeeding, which causes mastitis.

The BEST way to explain an evaluation process is to utilize the following when serving as the chair of a quality improvement committee that is analyzing processes and procedures to identify where problems exist:

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
While each of these ways has some merit, using a flow chart is the most effective way to illustrate a process that needs to be reviewed since it can demonstrate each stage in the process and how it relates to other processes. The benefit of a process presentation over a story or film is that the committee members don't need to memorize the steps or take notes in order to remember them all. The quantity of pictures needed makes it challenging to illustrate each stage in a process.

How long are immunoglobulin M antibodies against hepatitis A virus (IgM anti-HAV) detectable in the blood after exposure to HAV?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The blood can be tested for immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to HAV (IgM anti-HAV), which are used to diagnose hepatitis A, 3 weeks after exposure and at the first sign of jaundice. The IgM anti-HAV titer starts to decline over the course of 4-6 weeks and disappears from the blood after 6-12 months. IgM anti-HAV is also present during the outset of jaundice and will remain positive for the rest of the person's life, suggesting immunity to HAV.

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