Blender (3D Animation) Test 1

0%

What is the name of a group of computers linked together to render different frames of a same animation?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
A render farm is a collection of computers connected by a network and each capable of rendering one frame of an animation. When each computer completes a frame, it moves on to the next available frame to render and repeats the process until all of the frames have been rendered. The software that manages the other computers is usually included in most 3D animation packages. Within the program, this technique is known as "network rendering."

What is the most common name for the process of creating an item on a computer in 3D space?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The procedure is commonly referred to as "modeling," believe it or not. Essentially, it entails joining four point polygons within the software and shifting points to shape the desired object. It's a fascinating but time-consuming procedure because the only forms you can use in the program aside from polygons are primitives, which are basic objects like circles, cylinders, and cubes.

In most software systems, the "reflection" is actually made up of three elements to simulate real-world reflections. Which of the following does not belong in the reflection channel?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The transparency channel determines how transparent the texture of an object is. The amount of light that is spilled over the object's surface is controlled by specularity. The glossiness of a texture determines how glossy it appears. And reflection refers to the amount of real reflection you'll see in an object; think of a mirror as having a 100% reflection value and working your way down from there for your own reflection. A new car may reflect 60% of the light, whereas a piece of hard wood flooring may reflect only 2% of the light.

Light bounces off of items in the actual world to illuminate a region. This real-world light simulation in 3D software is incredibly render expensive on the computer, yet it generates stunning effects. Can you guess what this simulation is called by most software?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The calculated bouncing of light within a space to light a computer scene is known as radiosity. The end result is stunning, giving the artificially manufactured items a more realistic feel. The only disadvantage is that the render time is frequently doubled by a factor of 10 or more.
Pixar is the king of radiosity, in my opinion. The lighting in "Ratatouille" blew me away the first time I saw it; it was so dramatic and realistic. Later, Pixar produced a technical paper detailing how they illuminated the scenes and how radiosity played a significant role in the film's tone.

What is the name of the method of adding color, reflection, transparency, translucency, and roughness after the character or object has been built in the program?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Texturing is a skill in and of itself. It takes a long time to fine-tune a texture. A channel for luminosity, diffusion, color, specularity, glossiness, reflection, transparency, translucency, refraction, bump, and smoothing is commonly included in the basic texture.

Because nothing is pre-programmed in the software, everything in a 3D scene must be animated manually or calculated by the computer. What is the name of the algorithm that simulates real-world effects like gravity, wind, liquids, and collisions?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
Wind, liquids, smoke, gravity, and collisions are all created using dynamics—basically anything that would be too time consuming to manually draw.
The following is a real-life illustration of dynamics. As if an explosion had occurred, I'm modeling a damaged wall. After that, you can add a collision object and animate it through the pre-cut wall. To react to the collision, you'd apply a hard dynamic to the wall. The scenario would be subjected to gravity, which, if you recall from Physics class, has a numerical value of -9.8 m/s2. Then, to prevent the wall and all of its shattered components from plummeting into oblivion due to gravity's effects, you create a ground dynamic plane. You calculate the interaction and evaluate the outcomes after applying all of these dynamics and tweaking a few settings under each tab.

What are the basic forms needed to construct an object, such as cubes, cylinders, and circles?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
The majority of modeling is done with polygons that have been joined and molded, but you will occasionally need to add a conventional shape to an object. Primitive forms are the most common shapes. Every piece of software has a similar collection of primitives, but some may be missing. A box, a ball, a disc, a cone, and a capsule are included in a sample standard set from Lightwave 3D, my preferred software. A drop-down menu of another fifteen or so primitives is available.

In 3D animation, unlike traditional animation, the computer interpolates the movement between postures rather than having an artist hand animate each frame. What are the names of the key poses?

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
There can be any number of key frames, depending on the object's animation requirements and the artist's desired effect. I've done facial animations that required a new key frame every two to three frames to match the phonetic syllables of human speaking, and I've had around two key frames per second per limb of a humanoid walking.
The interpolation between the frames is the most beautiful aspect of 3D in the computer. Rather than animating every frame like I would in 2D work, I can set a posture at frame one and another at frame 14, and the computer will calculate the motion between the two critical frames, saving me the time of animating the twelve frames in between.

When creating a 3D object, it's a good idea to scale it up to the size of its real-world equivalent.

Correct! Wrong!

Explanation:
This is significant for a few of reasons.
The first is the relative scale of two objects. You will lose the sense of spatial orientation and hence the realism of the shot if you animate a camera move by two objects of various sizes that are not designed to scale, or at least to the scale of each other.
The integration of computer-generated things into a live-action picture comes in second. I recently saw "Pearl Harbor" and will use it as an example. The Japanese Cg planes would appear to be flying faster than they should be in real life if they weren't made to scale in the computer. The majority of the audience would see something "wrong" in the scene, but they wouldn't know what it was. If the viewer wonders what they're looking at, they leave the film's world and miss some of the emotional effect it's trying to achieve.

Related Content
Open